Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
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Hair Restoration Answers

Why Is My Hair Dry And Kinky After My Hair Transplant?

March 5th, 2018

Q: I had a hair restoration procedure and the hair grew, but after one year the hair was kinky and dry. It has remained like this ever since.

From what I have read Dr Bernstein says this is uncommon but can happen. I understand there is no definitive explanation for this but I would like Dr Bernstein’s opinion on why this happens. My theory is that DHT is more prominent on the top of the head and is changing the structure of the transplanted hair. The hair is so dry and unmanageable it looks like I am wearing a wig. I await his response. — P.O., Greenwich, CT

A: Some dryness and texture changes can occur after a hair transplant and this usually self-corrects over 1-2 years during which time the transplanted hair gradually regains its original luster and texture. These changes are most likely due to the unavoidable trauma that takes place as follicles are removed from the scalp and placed into recipient sites. Excessive dryness can occur if the sebaceous glands had been stripped away from the graft. In FUT, this can be due to over dissection (i.e., grafts that are trimmed too much). In FUE, this can be due to loss or damage to the sebaceous glands in the extraction process. Persistent kinkiness may represent either damage to grafts from the procedure (improper handling, crush injury) or effects of scarring in the recipient area (usually from older procedures which used larger recipient sites) that distort the growth of follicles.

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Hair Restoration Research

Innovations In Robotic Hair Restoration

March 5th, 2018

Synopsis: With the latest version of the ARTAS platform, 9x, Restoration Robotics has designed a faster and more accurate system for hair transplantation. The improved accuracy of harvesting and shortened procedure time increases graft viability, while smaller needles reduce scarring and allow patients to wear shorter hairstyles. Many of the changes in this upgrade have been made as a response to specific physician feedback.

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Hair Restoration Research

Advances in Robotic FUE

February 19th, 2018

Synopsis: Since the publication of “What’s New in Robotic Hair Transplantation” (Hair Transplant Forum Int’l. 2017; 27(3):100-101), there have been important improvements to the robotic system in both its incision and recipient site creation capabilities. These advances fall into four overlapping categories:increased speed, increased accuracy, increased functionality, and improved artificial intelligence (AI). The overlap occurs since improvements in functionality, accuracy, and AI can also increase the overall speed of the procedure. A faster procedure decreases the time grafts are outside the body and allows the physician to perform larger cases without placing additional oxidative stress on the follicles.

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Hair Restoration Research

Commentary on Redefining the “E” in FUE: Excision = Incision + Extraction

February 19th, 2018

Synopsis:There has been a change in the nomenclature of the FUE procedure. It will not be called Follicular Unit Excision, describing the two main components of an FUE procedure, incision (separatioin of the follicle from the tissue) and extraction (the removal of the follicular unit from the scalp once it is separated). Drs. Robert M. Bernstein and William R. Rassman’s commentary explains the importance of this change in terminology.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can Anyone Tell Me Why Dr. Bernstein Is Still Bald?

February 16th, 2018

Q: Can anyone tell me why Dr. Bernstein is still bald? — N.H., Brooklyn, NY

When Dr. Bernstein was younger and started to lose his hair, it really didn’t bother him. After medical school, he began his career as a dermatologist and became aware of surgical hair restoration. It was then when he realized that he would not be a good candidate for a hair transplant procedure, even if he wanted one, because his donor area is very thin. In the years since, he has gotten used to being bald. But his not being a candidate made him keenly aware of who is and who is not a good candidate for surgery, and this insight has helped earn him a reputation as an honest and ethical practitioner of hair transplantation.

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Bernstein Medical News

Does Eating McDonald’s Fries Cause Hair Growth?

February 13th, 2018

FUE Nomenclature changed to Follicular Unit Excision

There has been a lot of news recently circulating the web about a new way to help you grow your hair back; eating McDonald’s French fries. This theory is based on the findings of Professor, Junji Fukada of Yokohama University in Japan. Fukada and his team of researchers have studied the form of silicone called “dimethylpolysiloxane” that is used in frying oil at McDonalds to reduce frothing. Read more!

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Bernstein Medical News

Dr. Bernstein Featured in ARTAS Live Webinar

January 23rd, 2018

Dr. Bernstein's slide on Dr. Robert M. Bernstein were guest speakers in the ARTAS live webcast series where they discussed “What’s New in Robotic FUE.” They spoke to over 100 fellow surgeons and their staff on advances in robotic hair transplantation and led a Q and A session about the ARTAS Robotic System.

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Bernstein Medical News

New Nomenclature for FUE

January 23rd, 2018

FUE Nomenclature changed to Follicular Unit ExcisionThere has been a change in the terminology of the FUE procedure, it will now be called Follicular Unit Excision. This describes the two main components of an FUE procedure, incision (the separation of the follicular unit from the surrounding tissue) and extraction (the removal of the follicular unit from the scalp once it is separated). It is important to note that this is just a change in terminology, not in the technique itself. Click to read more!

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Hair Restoration Research

Researchers Untangle Potential Pathway to Regenerating Hair in a Bald Scalp

January 5th, 2018

Scientific research is often the quintessential example of taking something apart to learn how it works. A team of researchers has used that age-old technique to unwind the complex process by which embryonic cells organize into functional skin that includes “organoids” like hair follicles. By untangling this biological mystery, they were able to develop a model that could potentially lead to hair regeneration treatments and other advances in regenerative medicine. The study — “Self-organization process in newborn skin organoid formation inspires strategy to restore hair regeneration of adult cells” — was published in the August 22nd, 2017 issue of the journal PNAS.

Lei M, et al. 2017

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Bernstein Medical News

Dr. Bernstein Featured in Huffington Post on Hair Loss Genetics

December 11th, 2017

Huffington Post on Hair Loss GeneticsDr. Bernstein addresses the common myth that hair loss is inherited exclusively from the mother’s side of the family – and, more specifically, from your mother’s father. While your mother’s (or maternal grandfather’s) genes can be the culprit, the characteristics of your hair are influenced by many different genes that may come from either or both sides of your family.

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Updated: 2019-03-27 | Published: 2014-02-11