Answers to frequently asked questions about hair transplant surgery.

How Experienced Are Bernstein Medical Hair Restoration Technicians?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 24th, 2014

Q: I know Dr. Bernstein is one of the leading hair restoration surgeons in the country but what about his medical assistants? How experienced are the hair restoration technicians that help him during surgery?

A: My medical assistants and technicians are full time employees, and many of them have worked closely with me for many years; in fact, many of them have been with me since the inception of FUT, the procedure I pioneered way back in 1995. I do not hire, nor have I ever hired, per diem technicians.

All my hair restoration technicians are highly skilled and experienced in stereo-microscopic dissection and follicular unit graft placement. Even with Robotic FUE, being highly skilled and experienced in stereo-microscopic dissection is important since every graft that the robot harvests is examined, counted, and, when necessary, trimmed to ensure they are of the highest quality before being implanted into the scalp.

Because of the intense in-house training of our staff, we have received national accreditation from the “Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care” (AAAHC/Accreditation Association) for maintaining rigorous standards in patient care.

Read more about how we train our surgical staff.

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Can A Hair Transplant Restore Hair Loss After Radiation Treatment?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 18th, 2014

Q: I received radiation therapy to my scalp two years ago to treat a brain tumor. I lost my hair during treatment and it has not grown back. The doctors said that this treatment might result in permanent hair loss. Is a hair transplant a viable option after radiation treatment?

A: Unlike chemotherapy which generally causes a reversible shedding of hair (called anagen effluvium), radiation therapy can cause both reversible shedding and the permanent loss of hair follicles (scarring alopecia).  Hair can be successfully transplanted into these scarred areas – but there must be enough donor hair to do so. If the radiotherapy was localized, a hair transplant procedure is often quite effective – although several procedures may be required to achieve adequate coverage of the irradiated areas.

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If I Was Told That I Am Not A Good Candidate For An FUT Procedure Can I Have FUE?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 5th, 2014

Q: At one time, I was told my donor area was not sufficient for an FUT hair transplant procedure. Does this also mean I’m not qualified for a FUE procedure either?

A: Great question. You are not giving me quite enough information to answer your question specifically, so I will answer in more general terms. If your donor hair supply was not good enough to do FUT (i.e. you have too little donor hair and too much bald area to cover) then most likely you will not be a candidate for FUE either, since both procedures require, and use up, donor hair. That said, if don’t need that much donor hair, but the nature of your donor area is such that a linear FUT scar might be visible then FUE might be useful.

An example would be the case in which a person has limited hair loss in the front of his scalp, has relatively low donor density, and wants to keep his hair on the short sides. In this case, FUT would not be appropriate as you might see the line scar, but we might be able to harvest enough hair through FUE to make the procedure cosmetically worthwhile. Remember, with low density neither procedure will yield that much hair to be used in the recipient area.

Another example is an Asian whose hair emerges perpendicular from the scalp so that a line incision is difficult to hide, i.e. the hair will not lie naturally over it. A third example is where the patient’s scalp is very tight. In this case, the donor density might be adequate, but it would just be hard to access it using a strip FUT procedure. In this case, FUE would also be appropriate.

From these situations, one can see that the decision to perform FUE vs FUT, or even a hair transplant at all, can be quite nuanced and requires a careful evaluation by a hair restoration surgeon with expertise in both procedures.

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Is a Hair Transplant Possible Using Someone Else’s Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 18th, 2014

Q: Can you do a hair transplant using someone else’s hair?

A: Unfortunately, this is not possible because your body would reject the hair transplant without the use of immunosuppressive drugs. The problem with immune suppressants is that they will lower your natural immune response,  increasing your susceptibly  to infections and even cancer, and you’ll have to take them for the rest of your life.

A transplant using someone else’s hair is also not desirable for aesthetic reasons. There’s the style of the hair, its texture, thickness, color, etc. Trying to find the perfect donor whose hair would complement & flatter your particular features and blend in with your remaining hair would be a significant, if not impossible, challenge. It would be possible, however, to transplant the hair from one identical twin to another, but most likely if one went bald, so would the other.

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Do You Transplant Hair Evenly if I Part My Hair on the Left?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 24th, 2014

Q: For patients who intend to keep their hair parted on the left side, do you follow any rule of making the left side more dense then the right or is it distributed evenly?

A: On a first hair transplant procedure, I generally place the sites/grafts symmetrically, even if a patient combs his hair to one side. The reason is that the person may change his styling after the procedure and I like to have the first hair transplant symmetrical for maximum flexibility. An exception would be a person with limited donor reserves. In this case, weighting on the part side is appropriate in the first procedure. Once the first hair transplant grows in and the person decides how he wants to wear his hair long-term a second transplant can be weighted to accommodate this. Weighting can be done in one, or both, of two ways: 1) by placing the sites closer together on the part side or 2) by placing slightly larger follicular units on the part side.

If a person decides to comb his hair back, then forward weighting is used. For greater details on this, please see some of my publications where I address the aesthetics of hair transplantation:

Bernstein RM, Rassman WR: The Aesthetics of Follicular Transplantation. Dermatol Surg 1997; 23: 785-99.

Bernstein RM, Rassman WR: Follicular Transplantation: Patient Evaluation and Surgical Planning. Dermatol Surg 1997; 23: 771-84.

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How Long After Facelift Can I Have Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 25th, 2013

Q: I am having a facelift next month and also want to have a hair transplant soon after. How long should I wait between procedures?

A: Although it would be possible to do a hair transplant as soon as a week after a face or brow lift, ideally one should wait at least three months between procedures for the following reasons: 1) there will be less tension in the donor area and, therefore, it will be possible to harvest more grafts, 2) if there is any shedding from the facelift it will make the planning of the hair transplant more difficult, 3) it will leave the option of adding hair, in or around, any problematic surgical scars, and 4) will provide the ability to add hair to any area of thinning that might result from the facelift.

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Does Surgeon Determine Angle of Hair In Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 1st, 2013

Q: I notice that some patients end up with hair that seems to stand straight up while others have hair that flows to one side or the other. Does the angle at which you place the follicles in the scalp ultimately determine how the hair will lie? Is there some artistic talent needed when placing these follicles so that patients end up with hair that lies flat or sticks straight up? What determines this? Do we have control over it?

A: Great question. You are correct, the angle of the recipient sites largely determines the hair direction. Hair should be planted the way it grows (i.e., in a forward and horizontal direction at the frontal hairline.) It is extremely important that it is transplanted that way to look natural. The body will alter the angle a bit as it heals, usually elevating it slightly and re-creating any prior wave (yes, waves are determined by the scalp, rather than by the hair follicles per se). In a properly performed hair transplant, a straight-up appearance should be due to grooming, it should not have been a result of the actual procedure. Hair should never be transplanted perpendicular to the scalp. I discussed these important concepts way back in my 1997 paper “The Aesthetics of Follicular Transplantation“.

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After Hair Transplant Is There Shock Hair Loss In Donor Area?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 23rd, 2013

Q: I have seen through forums that a hair transplant gives severe shock loss in the donor zone (especially behind ears) after the surgery. Doctors say it is temporary and can last about six months or more. Frankly, do you believe in this? Will the donor shocked hair recover?

A: It depends if you are speaking about follicular unit hair transplantation using strip harvesting (FUT) or Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). With FUT, it is extremely uncommon to have any shock hair loss in the donor area. This could occur if the hair transplant procedure was done improperly, i.e. the donor area was closed too tightly. In this case, some hair loss may be permanent. This is one of the reasons that very large hair transplant sessions are unwise. Shock hair loss in FUE is more common, but is generally not significant and should eventually recover completely.

That said, some shock hair loss in the recipient area is quite common with either hair restoration procedure (FUT or FUE). This is particularly the case if there is a lot of existing miniaturized hair (hair that is starting to thin) in the transplanted area.

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If There is Some Bleeding at the Graft Site, Will it Affect Growth?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 24th, 2012

Q: I am currently 8 days post op. I started to massage my hair in the shower to get rid of the scabs. When I was done I looked in the mirror and saw two of my transplanted hairs were slightly bleeding but still intact. What does that mean? Did I lose the grafts?

A: If they bleed, but were not dislodged (i.e. did not come out), they should grow fine. Just be gentle for the next week. Generally, when follicular unit transplantation is performed with tiny sites (19-21 gauge needles) the grafts are permanent at 10 days. Since I did not perform your procedure and am not familiar with the technique your doctor actually used, I would give it the extra few days. View this post on the Hair Transplant Blog

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Can Pulling Out Transplanted Hair Effect Growth After Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 8th, 2012

Q: At about six days post op, I started to notice hairs on the tips of my fingers as I rubbed off my scabs. Additionally, if I tugged on the hairs lightly, they would immediately come out without any resistance. I did notice the small bulb at the end of the hair. My question is: is it not recommended to remove these hairs that have separated from the follicle? Should I just allow them to fall out on their own, or does it matter at all? Can pulling hairs out at 10 days post op effect growth differently than individuals who allow the hairs to fall out naturally?

A: At 10 days it should usually not make a difference, but I would still just let the hair fall out naturally when you shampoo. If there are any crusts (scabs) on the hair they are cosmetically bothersome, they can be gently scrubbed off in the shower at 10 days when very tiny recipient sites are used and you should wait slightly longer if larger sites were used. Since I don’t know the technique or site size used in your procedure, I would wait a full two weeks to be certain the grafts are permanent. View this post on the Hair Transplant Blog.

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Rare Complication Of A Hair Transplant: Necrosis In The Recipient Area

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 3rd, 2012

Q: What is the most common cause of necrosis (death of tissue) in the recipient area?

A: Recipient site necrosis is one of the worst complications of a hair transplant and results in skin ulceration and scarring. Usually it is caused by a combination of a few or many factors. Each by itself should not present a risk. Read on for the list of risk factors.

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Do You Perform Hair Transplants With Body Or Leg Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 27th, 2012

Q: Dr. Bernstein, can you please comment on leg and body hair transplants?

A: I’ve tried the technique in the past but have been dissatisfied with the results. Scalp hair, unlike the rest of the body, has multiple hairs rising out of each follicle. With leg and body hair, you have only one hair per follicle, not follicular units of multiple hairs. Leg hair is also very fine. It might thicken up a little bit after it is transplanted, but not enough to be clinically useful. In men you want full thickness hair, so fine hair can make it look like it is miniaturizing, as it does when you’re losing it. Continue reading this post by clicking here.

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Preventing Shock Hair Loss After Hair Transplant

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 22nd, 2012

Q: Can shock loss be eliminated by using special surgical techniques?

A: Although there have been no scientific studies proving this, shock hair loss can most likely be minimized by keeping the recipient sites parallel to the hair follicles, by not creating a transplanted density too great in areas of existing hair, and by using minimal epinephrine (adrenaline) in the anesthetic. We implement all of these techniques. Finasteride may also decrease shock hair loss, or at least help any (miniaturized) hair that is lost to re-grow. That said, some shock hair loss from a hair transplant is unavoidable regardless of the technique as it is a normal physiologic response to stress.

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How Long Between Hair Transplant Procedures?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 1st, 2012

Q: If I wanted a second procedure what is the typical time that I should wait after the first hair transplant? — P.L, Queens, NY

A: It takes about a year to see the full results of a hair transplant, so it is generally best to wait at least this time before considering a second -– since you may not need one.

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Multiple Hair Transplant Procedures to Improve Hair Density?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 28th, 2012

Q: I was told that I have low hair density in the donor area. Would multiple procedures be possible to improve the result? — J.G., Hoboken, NJ

A: Yes, but subsequent procedures would be smaller and there is a point of diminishing returns where additional procedures would yield so little hair that they would not be practical. There is a finite donor supply and once this is tapped, no more hair transplants are possible, regardless when one uses FUT or FUE.

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When To Assess One’s Donor Supply?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 23rd, 2011

Q: I am 24 years old and just starting to thin. I was told by another doctor that it was too early to have a hair transplant, but the hair on the back and sides of my scalp seems really thick. Shouldn’t I have a hair transplant now, just in case I am not a candidate in the future? — A.S., Cherry Hill, NJ

A: The most important criteria in determining who will be a candidate for a hair transplant is the presence of sufficient permanent donor hair. When hair loss is early, it is often hard for the doctor to determine this, since early on the donor area can appear very stable. It is not until the front and/or top of the scalp has significant thinning that the donor area may also show thinning. Therefore, it is only at this time that the stability of the donor area can adequately be assessed.

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What Is The Cost Of A Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 15th, 2011

Q: I am interested in having a hair transplant at your clinic. What do you charge if you do the surgery? — B.N., Newark, NJ

A: My fee schedule for hair restoration procedures as well as repairs, robotic FUE, consults, etc., can be found in the new patient section of the website. Visit the Hair Transplant Costs page to see the fee schedule.

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What Does Hair Transplant Procedure Do To Existing Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 13th, 2011

Q: What does the hair transplantation process do to your existing hair? — R.V., London, UK

A: When we perform hair transplant surgery, we transplant into an area that is either bald or has some existing hair. The hair that is existing is undergoing a process called miniaturization. What this means is that the hairs are continuing to decrease in size – both in diameter and in length. When we perform a hair transplant, we don’t transplant around the existing miniaturized hair on your scalp, we transplant through it. And the reason why we do that is because the miniaturized hair, the fine hair that is being affected by DHT, is eventually going to disappear, so you don’t want there to be any gaps.

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Read about the hair transplant procedure

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Can I Tell If I Will Be A Candidate For A Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 31st, 2011

Q: Can I tell before I start to bald if I will be a candidate for a hair transplant.

A: Usually not. The main reason one is either a candidate or not is the stability (permanency) of the hair in the back and sides of ones scalp – the donor area. Since the top of the scalp usually thins first, if the top has not started to thin, the donor area will always appear to be OK. It is only when you have significant thinning on the front or top of your scalp can we actually begin to assess the stability of the donor area with any degree of accuracy.

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Why Does Vice President Joe Biden’s Hair Transplant Look Unnatural?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 28th, 2011

Q: There is a famous hair transplant out there, Vice President, Joe Biden. How come it looks so unnatural? — W.S., Los Angeles, CA

A: With Joe Biden’s hair transplant a number of errors were made. Some were unavoidable due to the older technology and some were just poor planning. He had a hair transplant consisting mainly of large plugs because that was the way hair transplants were performed many years ago. But many of those plugs have now been fixed.

The persistent (but avoidable) problem is that Vice President Biden has a low, broad hairline. But when you see a low broad hairline one expects to see the rest of head to be covered with hair. But he didn’t have enough donor hair to accomplish this. With better planning, the hairline would have been more receded at the temples, producing a more natural, balanced look.

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When Are Surgical Staples Removed After Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 30th, 2011

Q: I hear you leave staples in sometimes up to three weeks after a hair transplant. Why do you leave staples in that long? – M.C., Boca Raton, FL

A: My reason for leaving some staples in longer is that the tensile strength of the wound continues to increase (significantly) during the first three week period after surgery — actually, it will continue to gain strength for up to one year post-op. To give the wound the best chance to heal, on average, I take out alternating staples at 10 days and the remaining staples at 20 days.

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How Can I Make a Hair Transplant Less Obvious Post-op?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 12th, 2011

Q: I am considering a hair transplant and would like to have the procedure and not be overly obvious about it. What are my options in hiding or concealing any redness after a week or so after the hair restoration. — R.T., Manhattan, NY

A: There are a number of factors that can make a hair transplant obvious in the post-op period. These include the redness that you are asking about, but also crusting and swelling.

Redness after hair restoration surgery is easily camouflaged with ordinary make-up. At one week post-op, the grafts are pretty secure, so that make-up can be applied and then gently washed off at the end of the day. Since the recipient wounds are well healed by one week, using make-up does not increase the risk of infection. At 10 days after the hair transplant, the grafts are permanent and can not be dislodged, therefore, at this time the makeup can be removed without any special precautions.

Usually, residual crusting (scabbing) presents more of a cosmetic problem than redness, but can be minimized with meticulous post-op care. Crusts form when the blood or serum that oozes from recipient sites after the procedure dries on the scalp. Although it is relatively easy to prevent scabs from forming with frequent washing of the scalp after the surgery, once the scabs harden they are difficult to remove without dislodging the grafts.

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Is Shedding Three Months After a Hair Transplant Normal?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 10th, 2011

Q: I am about 3 months post-op after my hair restoration procedure. I have noticed some hair shedding in the frontal part of my scalp. I have continued both Propecia and Minoxidil. Is there anything I can do and should I be concerned? — M.B., Chicago, IL

A: Shedding of some of the patient’s existing hair in, and around, the area of a hair transplant is a relatively common occurrence after a hair transplant and should not be a cause of concern. The mechanism appears to be a normal response of the body to the stress of the hair restoration surgery -– i.e., site creation, adrenaline in the anesthetic etc. Some doctors claim that their hair transplant techniques are so “impeccable” that their patients do not experience shedding. This is a false claim. Although using very small recipient sites and limiting the use of epinephrine may mitigate shedding somewhat, shedding is a normal part of the hair transplant process and the risk is unavoidable.

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How Do You Make Recipient Sites in a Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 20th, 2011

Q: How do you make the recipient sites in a hair transplant? — N.P., New Delhi, India

A: I make the recipient sites using 19-, 20-, 21- and 22-gauge needles. The higher the number, the finer the needle. The hairline is done with a 21-gauge, which is really very tiny. Eyebrow sites are created with a 22-. When one draws blood in a routine blood test, an 18-g needle is used and, of course, there are no residual marks. The instruments we use are significantly finer than this.

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How Will Hair Transplant Look If Donor Area Hair Is Dark And Recipient Area Hair Is Gray?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 18th, 2011

Q: If a person is graying on the top and sides and you do a hair transplant from the back, will the top look darker after the hair restoration? — W.C., Houston, TX

A: The hair is taken from the back and sides of the scalp and the follicular units, once dissected from the donor strip, are randomly inserted into the recipient area. That way, the color of the harvested hair will be mixed and will match perfectly.

Usually, people’s hair is lighter on the top because of the sun, so when you move the hair from the back and sides to the top, it will actually lighten to match the surrounding hair, if it didn’t match already.

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How Are Follicular Unit Grafts Distributed in a Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 16th, 2011

Q: How are grafts distributed in a hair transplant? Are they distributed evenly? — B.V., Jersey City, NJ

A: Actually, we don’t make the transplanted hair evenly distributed. It is usually front weighted, so that the hair restoration will look most full when looking at the person head on.

Framing the face is the most important part of the restoration. Covering the top is the next most important region and, if the patient has enough donor supply, then hair can be added to the crown.

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Do I Need Hair Cut Before Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 14th, 2011

Q: I am considering having a hair transplant. Does my hair need to be cut? — I.S., New York, NY

A: In all hair transplant procedures, we are able to transplant into areas of existing hair without it having to be cut. The question of whether hair needs to be cut in the donor area depends upon the way the donor hair is obtained (harvested).

With a Follicular Unit Hair Transplant procedure using single strip harvesting method (FUT), only the strip of hair that is removed needs to be cut. When the procedure is finished, the hair above the incision lays down over the sutured area and it become undetectable.

In Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE), particularly in sessions over 600 grafts, large areas of the donor area must be clipped short (to about 1-2mm in length) in order to obtain enough donor hair.

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After Hair Transplant, Can I Sleep Normally?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 12th, 2011

Q: Can I sleep as I normally do after a hair transplant? — G.C., Los Angeles, CA

A: We ask that you sleep on your back, with your head elevated on a few pillows. By raising your head, the pillows decrease any swelling that normally occurs after the hair transplant. We also use a small injection of cortisone given in the arm to help decrease swelling.

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What Problems Can Arise from Transplanting the Crown Too Early?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 7th, 2011

Q: What is the problem with transplanting the crown too early? — P.L., Newark, NJ

A: If a person’s hair loss continues –- which is almost always the case -– the crown will expand and leave the transplanted area isolated, i.e. looking like a pony-tail. The surgeon can perform additional hair transplant procedures to re-connect the transplanted area to the fringe, but this is a large area that can require a lot of hair, and it is often impossible to determine when a person is young if the donor supply will be adequate. View the full post to see a photo of a patient who had an early hair transplant to his crown.

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After Hair Transplant What Is Normal Growth Cycle of Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 29th, 2010

Q: After my hair transplant procedure I had some shock loss, and then after about 4 1/2 to 7 months I had tremendous growth — really thick. I was amazed actually. Now, at 8 months it has thinned again, quite a lot compared to the growth I had before. I just wondered if this was a normal growth pattern and whether further growth could be expected? — N.T., Brooklyn, NY

A: This is not the most common situation, but should not be a cause for concern. The newly transplanted hairs are initially synchronous when they first grow in — i.e. they tend to all grow in around the same time (with some variability). This is in contrast to normal hair, where every hair is on its own independent cycle. Sometimes the newly transplanted hair will shed at one time before the cycles of each hair become more varied asynchronous.

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Does Body Hair Transplant Leave Scarring?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 15th, 2010

Q: I heard that it is possible to transplant body hair to the scalp. Does it leave any scarring? — V.P., Cherry Hill, NJ

A: Unfortunately, it does leave scarring. And since the hair is generally of poor quality, it is usually not worth the trade-off. View the full post to see an example of the typical scarring seen in a BHT procedure.

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How Long Does Hair Transplant Surgery Take?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 21st, 2010

Q: Is it correct that the hair transplant surgery lasts about eight hours or if there is a range, what is that generally? — M.R., Montclair, NJ

A: The range is about 5 to 8 hours. For a completely bald person, it would be in the higher range. Keep in mind that the person is just relaxing, watching TV or dozing off. The time goes by quickly for the patient. Since there is no general anesthesia, there is no medical risk for this relatively long procedure.

To review the procedure in more detail, please visit our Overview of FUT Hair Transplant Procedure section; which includes details for before, during, and after the hair transplant. View the Overview of FUE Hair Transplant Procedure section for details on the follicular unit extraction procedure.

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What Length Is Hair After Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 25th, 2010

Q: Is transplanted hair the same length as existing hair?

A: The hair is first clipped to about 1-mm before it is transplanted. The transplanted hair will look like stubble for the first few weeks after the hair restoration procedure. It is then shed and the newly transplanted follicles go into a resting phase for about two months.

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Can Scabs Harm Hair Transplant Two Weeks After Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 4th, 2010

Q: I had a hair transplant about a month ago and I had scabs and some dead skin until day 16 or 17. Will that endanger the growth of the hair restoration procedure?

A: No, it will not. If follicular units were used for the hair transplant, the grafts should be permanent at 10 days. After this time, you can scrub as much as you need to get the scabs off.

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After A Hair Transplant Will Hair Fall Out At The Root?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 2nd, 2010

Q: I had a hair transplant 10 days ago and I lost some hair that looks like the hair fell out at the root.

A: When there is shedding after a hair transplant, it is the hair that is lost, not the follicle that contains the growth center (the follicle eventually produces the new hair).

Since the “hair” usually consists of a hair shaft and the inner and outer root sheaths, which creates a little bulb at the end of the hair, it looks like the hair is “falling out at the root.” Do not be concerned as this is not the growth center.

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Does Strip Harvesting In Hair Transplant Make Donor Area Smaller?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 19th, 2010

Q: I have been reading about hair transplantation and I have a question concerning FUT (strip-harvesting). I understand, in this method, a strip is excised from the back of the scalp, the wound then closed. I wonder, then, is not the overall surface of the scalp reduced in this procedure? After two or three procedures, especially, (or even after one large session) will not a patient’s hairline also be shifted? That is, the front hairline would move back by the amount of scalp excised, or, more likely, the “rear hairline” (which ends at the back of the neck) must certainly be “moved upward.” At least, this is how I imagine it would be. Is my logic flawed? I’ve been trying to understand this in researching the procedure, but the point still evades me.

A: The hair bearing area is much more distensible (stretchable) than the bald area and just stretches out after the procedure. As a result, the density of the hair in the donor area will decrease with each hair transplant session, but the position of the upper and lower margins of the donor area don’t move much – if at all. As a result, the major limitation of how much donor hair can be removed is the decreasing hair density, rather than a decrease in the size of the donor area.

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When Will I See Full Results Of Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 19th, 2010

Q: I understand that seeing the result of a hair transplant is a process – what can I expect?

A: It generally takes a year to see the full results of a hair transplant. Growth usually begins around 2 1/2 to 3 months and at 6-8 months the hair transplant starts to become comb-able.

Over the course of a year, the hair will gain in thickness and in length and may also change in character. During this time, hair will often become silkier, less kinky or take on a wave, depending upon the original characteristics of the patient’s hair.

In subsequent hair restoration procedures, growth can be slower.

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Can A Hair Transplant Cause Thinning?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 5th, 2010

Q: If you transplant grafts in between the thinned out areas, is there a risk of cutting previously normal roots, even if one is cautious?

A: Healthy hair can be temporarily shocked from a hair transplant and then shed (the process is called telogen effluvium) but it will not be permanently damaged.

Any healthy hair that is lost in this shedding process should re-grow.

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When Should Hair Transplant Be Considered For Thinning Area?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 19th, 2010

Q: At what level of thinning should the hair transplant be done?

A: A hair transplant should be considered in an area of thinning when:

  • The area has not responded to medical therapy (finasteride 1mg a day orally and minoxidil 5% topically for one year).
  • The thinning is significant enough that it can’t be disguised with simple grooming (i.e. is a cosmetic problem even when the hair is combed well).

Other factors that are important include:

  • the age of the patient
  • the donor supply
  • whether the thinning is in the front of the scalp or in the crown
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Dr. Bernstein Answers Hair Restoration Questions From Bizymoms.com Readers

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 9th, 2010

Bizymoms.com, the premier work-at-home community on the Internet with more than 5 million visitors per year, has interviewed Dr. Robert M. Bernstein in order to answer readers’ common questions about hair restoration and hair loss.

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After Hair Transplant, When Can Patients Expose Scalp To Sunlight?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 8th, 2010

Q: When can patients go in the sun after a hair transplant?

A: Following a hair transplant, patients should protect their scalps from the sun for about a month.

This does not mean one needs to stay indoors. It just means that after a hair restoration surgery you should wear a hat or a good sunscreen when outdoors.

Sunburns on the scalp should be avoided, not just for persons having a hair transplant, but for everyone.

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After Hair Transplant, Do Patients Wear Bandage And If So How Long?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 2nd, 2010

Q: Do patients need to wear a bandage after the surgery and for how long?

A: In a properly performed follicular unit hair transplant, the patient can remove any bandages the day after the procedure and gently shower/shampoo the transplanted area.

The bandages do not need to be reapplied.

The reason the dressing can be removed so soon is that follicular unit grafts fit into tiny needle-size incisions that heal in just one day.

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Can Hair Transplant Into Scar Use Cloned Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 29th, 2010

Q: If you have already had a hair transplant, once cloning becomes available, will you be able to transplant the cloned hair into the first transplant’s scar on the back of the head? I like to wear my hair short, especially in the summer, and also would feel more comfortable knowing there is no scar in my head.

A: Yes, as long as the scar is not thickened, cloned hair should grow just as normally transplanted hair would and would be a great way to address any residual scarring from the procedure.

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After Hair Transplant, What Is Recommended Hair Length To Hide Scar?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 25th, 2010

Q: I never kept my hair really long, what length can I wear my hair after a hair transplant to hide that I had a procedure?

A: Hair transplants, whether using the strip method to harvest the donor hair or by extracting individual follicular units one-by-one directly from the scalp, will leave some scarring. If the hair is long enough so that the underlying scalp is not visible, these scars will not be seen.

The quality and density of a person’s donor hair will affect this coverage and determine how short a person may keep his hair. In some cases the back and sides can be cut to a few millimeters, in others it would need to be kept longer. Since there is no scarring in the recipient area (the front and top of the scalp where the grafts are placed) the hair in these areas may be kept at any length.

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When Will Newly Transplanted Hair Start To Grow?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 15th, 2010

Q: It has been over a month after my hair transplant procedure and I am starting to get nervous. When can I expect to see some growth?

A: Transplanted hair begins to grow, on average, about 10 weeks after the procedure, although this number can vary. Hair tends to grow in waves and occasionally some new hair may start to grow as long as a year after your procedure. In general, growth is a bit slower with each hair transplant procedure, although the reason for this is not fully understood.

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Why Does A Hair Transplant Work?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 28th, 2009

Q: Why does a hair transplant grow – why doesn’t the transplanted hair fall out?

A: Hair transplants work because hair removed from the permanent zone in the back and sides of the scalp continues to grow when transplanted to the balding area in the front or top of one’s head. The reason is that the genetic predisposition for hair to fall out resides in the hair follicle itself, rather than in the scalp. This predisposition is an inherited sensitivity to the effects of DHT, which causes affected hair to decrease in diameter and in length and eventually disappear – a process called “miniaturization.” When DHT resistant hair from the back of the scalp is transplanted to the top, it will continue to be resistant to DHT in its new location and grow normally.

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In Follicular Unit Hair Transplant, Can You Double-up Follicular Units and Still Call it FUT?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 9th, 2009

Q: Could you accept easing of the very strict definition of FUT, which you published about 15 years ago? Could you agree to use mixture of single FU and double FU under the name of FUT?

A: One would never want grafts larger than the largest original follicular units or the results will not look natural. The artificially large grafts will stand out in relatively thin surroundings. If one were to try to fix this by transplanting the doubled FUs very close together (over one or more sessions) one risks running out of grafts for other areas of the scalp. In other words, you can’t fool mother nature.

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Can You Have a Hair Transplant to the Crown Before the Front or Top of Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 26th, 2009

Q: Can the crown be transplanted first instead of frontal area? Why is the crown the last choice? Any reasons behind it?

A: The crown can be transplanted first in patients who have very good donor reserves (i.e., high density and good scalp laxity). Otherwise, after a hair restoration procedure to the crown you may not be left with enough hair to complete the front and top if those areas were to bald.

Cosmetically, the front and top are much more important to restore than the back. A careful examination by a trained hair restoration surgeon can tell how much donor hair there is available for a hair transplant.

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Areas of Unethical Behavior Practiced Today

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 6th, 2009

Note from Dr. Bernstein: This article, by my colleague Dr. Rassman, is such important reading for anyone considering a hair transplant, that I felt it should be posted here in its entirety.

Areas of Unethical Behavior Practiced Today
William Rassman, MD, Los Angeles, California

I am disturbed that there is a rise in unethical practices in the hair transplant community. Although many of these practices have been around amongst a small handful of physicians, the recent recession has clearly increased their numbers. Each of us can see evidence of these practices as patients come into our offices and tell us about their experiences. When a patient comes to me and is clearly the victim of unethical behavior I can only react by telling the patient the truth about what my fellow physician has done to them. We have no obligation to protect those doctors in our ranks who practice unethically, so maybe the way we respond is to become a patient advocate, one on one, for each patient so victimized.

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Is Hair Transplant to Recreate Dense Hairline Too Good to be True?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 28th, 2009

Q: It’s a question that greatly concerns me because I’m investigating getting a transplant sometime next year. I’m 28 and thought I started balding at 26, but photographic evidence suggests it had started somewhere around age 24. I’m roughly a Class 2 now, and thanks to finasteride, I’ve stayed almost exactly where I was at […]

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What Scalp Exercises are Most Beneficial for Scalp Laxity?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 3rd, 2009

Q: I have been told a number of different ways to massage my scalp. What do you suggest?

A: We have found that the most successful technique is to perform the exercises: once a day, for at least 15 minutes, and using three different hand positions.

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What is Hair Transplant Graft Depth and How Long After Transplant can Grafts be Dislodged?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 27th, 2009

Q: How far into the scalp are the grafts placed and is the follicle far enough into the scalp that it will not be damaged? I have heard that the critical time to not touch your scalp is the first 2-3 weeks after the procedure. A: The growth part of the follicle is 3-4mm into […]

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After Hair Transplant, When Can I Resume Physical Training Or Exercise Regimen?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 18th, 2009

Q: When can patients resume physical training?

A: Moderate exercise may be resumed two days after the hair transplant.

The main limitation is to avoid putting direct pressure on the donor area and to avoid stretching the back of the scalp (neck flexion) as this will increase the chance of stretching the donor scar after a strip procedure.

There is no such limitation with follicular unit extraction (FUE). However, in general, contact sports should be avoided for at least 10 days with FUE and a month after a strip procedure.

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After Hair Transplant, How Long Until I Can Wash My Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 12th, 2009

Q: When can I wash my hair after a hair restoration procedure?

A: If a follicular unit hair transplant is performed so that there is a “snug fit” between the graft and the incision into which it is placed, the grafts are reasonably secure the day after the procedure.

At this time, gently washing with lightly flowing water and a patting (rather than rubbing) motion is permitted. Vigorous rubbing, however, will dislodge the grafts.

Over the course of the week the grafts become more secure, and at 10 days post-op they are permanent. At this time, normal scrubbing of the scalp is permitted.

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After Hair Transplant, is it OK to Pop or Scratch Pimples on Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 11th, 2009

Q: I have read that you can get pimples/ingrown hairs after 3-5 months post op. Is it ok if you pop or scratch these areas? A: It is common to get small pimples that begin to erupt 2-3 months post-op. These are due to newly growing hairs trying to work their way through the skin. […]

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Can Hair Transplant at Temples Cover Facelift Scar?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 27th, 2009

Q: I had a facelift about a year ago and the skin on the sides by my temples is really bare. It makes the scar a little obvious too. Can you transplant hair just at the temples to cover the scar? A: Hair loss in the temple area following a facelift is relatively common and […]

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Is Hair Transplant Using Body Hair an Option?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 15th, 2009

Q: I have heard of body hair transplants as an option being considered by some patients. Do you think that could be an option for me as my donor area isn’t able to provide the hair that I need? A: With body hair transplants, the hair quality is poor and there can be a significant […]

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Is it More Important to Do Scalp Exercises Before First Hair Transplant or Second Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 18th, 2008

Q: Is it more important to do scalp exercises before the first procedure or the second? A: When the scalp is tight, it can be useful for either the first or the second hair transplant. Keep in mind, however, that the scalp will naturally stretch between hair transplant procedures, so that if exercises were not […]

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Can One Have Hair Transplant to Cover Single Bald Patch?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 16th, 2008

Q: I just started to lose my hair but it’s just in one spot, like a circle on the left side of my head. Do you ever do a hair transplant just into a bald spot and not the whole head? A: It is possible to have a hair restoration procedure into a single bald […]

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After Hair Transplant What are Effects of DHT on Donor Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 25th, 2008

Q: Hi! I wanted to ask if after a hair restoration surgery the transplanted hair will eventually fall out? Because the surgery is to restore hair mainly for people with genetic hair loss which results from DHT, won’t the DHT make the new follicles implanted fall out as well? A: Hair loss is due to […]

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How Long Before Hair Transplant Should One Start Scalp Exercises?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 8th, 2008

Q: How long should I do scalp exercises before the procedure? A: To get the most benefit from scalp exercises, one should stretch vigorously on a regular basis for at least eight weeks prior to your hair restoration procedure. However, this will vary based upon the individual and upon how much the laxity needs to […]

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What Happened with Joe Biden’s “Pluggy” Hair Transplant and What Repair Strategy Do You Suggest?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 28th, 2008

Q: What’s the story with Joe Biden’s hair? A: Joe Biden — former Senator from Delaware and now the Vice President of the United States — apparently had a hair transplant many years ago using the older hair restoration techniques. This included not only transplanting hair in large plugs (corn rows), but using them to […]

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Did Dr. Bernstein Explain Hair Transplant Procedure on Oprah Winfrey Show?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 28th, 2008

Q: Heard you were on Oprah with a hair transplant patient of yours. Is this true? A: Yes. Oprah wanted to know if hair transplants really worked, so I was asked to be on The Oprah Winfrey Show to explain the latest in hair restoration techniques. They showed a film of me performing a follicular […]

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Are Scalp Exercises Before Hair Transplant Necessary?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 14th, 2008

Q: I am scheduled to have a hair transplant next month and wonder if I should do scalp exercises before the procedure? A: For the majority of patients, scalp exercises are not necessary. The scalp in the donor area has a fair amount of redundancy. With a properly planned hair transplant, the donor area will […]

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Which Causes Bigger Cosmetic Change: First Hair Transplant or Second Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 22nd, 2008

Q: In which procedure do you generally more of a change, the first or the second? A: The answer depends upon the patient’s baldness. If they are very bald, the first session will be the most noticeable, since going from no hair to hair is much more dramatic than going from some hair to more […]

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After Hair Transplant Can One Replace Hair Loss Medication with Laser Therapy, Herbs?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 15th, 2008

Q: I am interested in a hair transplant, but am turned off by the apparent side effects of follow up Propecia. Could herbs serve the purpose of Propecia? Regarding laser treatments, do they work on their own, or do you need drugs to supplement? Can laser damage in some cases, rather than benefit? It seems odd that laser therapy has been undertaken in Europe for 10 years, yet there are no published studies on the results. Might this be because it doesn’t work in the longer term?

A: Finasteride is the best medication. Herbs are not particularly effective for hair loss. You should consider trying finasteride.

If you are in the 2% group that has side effects with Propecia, just stop taking the medication. If you do not experience side effects, then there is no problem taking the medication long-term. Hair transplant surgery doesn’t prevent the progression of hair loss. That is why it is used in conjunction with medication.

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Hair Transplant Using Shedded Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 14th, 2008

Q: Can a hair transplant be done using the hair which has fallen out? A: A hair transplant is really a misnomer, since it is the follicle (or root) that is transplanted not the hair itself – although the transplanted follicle usually contains a hair. Hair, like fingernails, are dead and cannot grow once detached […]

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How Can One Tell if Hair Transplant Doctor is Trustworthy if They Charge by the Graft?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 3rd, 2008

Q: I had a follicular unit hair transplant performed by another doctor that was scheduled for 2,500 grafts and I ended up paying for exactly that amount. I was supposed to be paying per graft, so it seems strange that it came out to be exactly 2,500? How do I know what I really got? […]

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After FUT Hair Transplant, When Do Staples Come Out?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 1st, 2008

Q: How soon after the hair transplant procedure do I have to get the staples taken out? — T.J., Fort Lee, NJ

A: We remove every other staple at 10 days post-op. The remaining staples are generally removed at 20 days post-op. This varies based upon the patients scalp laxity and the width of the donor strip.

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Can Hair Transplant Cost be Paid Through Health Savings Account?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 23rd, 2008

Q: Can health savings account dollars be used for a hair transplant procedure? A: Generally yes, but I would check with your individual state and personal plan.

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What Medications are Used During Hair Transplant and are they Safe During Pregnancy?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 2nd, 2008

Q: Is it necessary to take medications before, during, or after the hair transplant? Will these medications affect pregnancy?

A: It is not necessary to take any medication for a hair transplant other than the local anesthesia used during the procedure.

Although I would not have a hair transplant during pregnancy, the procedure will have no effect on future ones.

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Does Hair Transplant Cost Include State Taxes?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 19th, 2008

Q: Are state taxes applicable for hair restoration procedures? A: There are no taxes on cosmetic procedures performed in New York State. Some states do have taxes. In New Jersey, for example, there is a cosmetic surgery tax of 6%, but not in NY.

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Is Hair Transplant or Treatment with Hair Loss Medication Preferred for People in Their 20′s?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 12th, 2008

Q: I am 25 year old who just started going bald. My doctor confirmed it’s pattern baldness and put me on Propecia and Rogaine. I don’t want to go bald at any age. So, instead of prolonging the process for 5-10 years and then having a HT, isn’t it easier to let the hair loss […]

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Does Hair Transplant Affect Quality of Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 18th, 2008

Q: I would be so grateful if you could give me some idea on how the quality of the hair that is transplanted is affected by its new ‘home’ and the native neighboring hair. Is it likely all the hair that is going to be able to come back to life with Propecia will also […]

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Do You Perform Hair Transplant for Hispanic People with Wavy Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 28th, 2008

Q: I am Hispanic and I have thick, black coarse wavy hair. Do you transplant Hispanics and are there any difficulties in performing hair transplants in them? A: Yes, we treat Hispanic patients. There are no specific issues unique to Hispanics when performing hair restoration procedures. However, things to consider are: Hispanics have a slightly […]

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Does FUT Hair Transplant Use Sutures or Surgical Staples?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 21st, 2008

Q: Do you currently prefer sutures or staples to close the donor area? — O.C., Dallas, TX

A: Staples, because they conserve more hair.

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Hair Transplant Post-op Care and Traveling From Abroad: When Can I Fly Home and Will I Have to Return?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 14th, 2008

Q: I am traveling from England for the hair transplant. When can I fly home and will I have to return after the procedure? — T.W., London, UK

A: You can fly home the second day after the procedure. We usually remove staples 10 and 20 days post-op. Patients that travel can have this done in their home town. We provide instructions and a staple remover that is easy for any health care professional to use. There should be no other reason to return to the office other than an optional one-year follow up.

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Will Second Hair Transplant Session be Different than First Session?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 17th, 2007

Q: My first hair transplant was a breeze. Will a second procedure be any different than the first? A: Generally in a second procedure, a patient can expect less swelling post-up although the reason for this is not known. There will also generally be less shedding in the second hair transplant session since the weak […]

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After Hair Transplant, What are White Specks on Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 26th, 2007

Q: After the day of the procedure, I could see what appeared as white specks on top of my scalp. Some are sticking out above the scalp more than others. I was wondering if the entire follicular unit should be at the level of the scalp. Is it normal for some part of it to […]

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Should Young Person Start with Hair Transplant at Crown?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 21st, 2007

Q: I am 26 years old, have had two successful hair transplants, but am still losing hair in the crown area. The doctor I have worked with told me that he does not do crown work on anyone until they are at least 40 (due to lack of donor area). I have very thick hair […]

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Can One Determine Hair Transplant Success Five Months After Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 5th, 2007

Q: It had been 5 months since my hair transplant. I only see minimal growth of maybe a few hundred fine hairs. My transplant consisted of 2,217 grafts. Could you give me your opinion if this is normal or is it a failed hair transplant? A: It is too early to tell. Hair grows in […]

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Some Hair Transplant Photos Seem Too Good to be True, Are they Real?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 12th, 2007

Q: I have seen some incredible photos on some websites. In some cases, they seem too good to be true. Are they real? A: Evaluating results is more complicated than simply looking at photos – even if they are un-retouched and not studio shots. For example, if 4,000 grafts were used to make a young […]

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Why Same Photos on Bernstein Medical Website and NewHair.com?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 8th, 2007

Q: I was looking at the hair transplant photos on the Bernstein Medical website. I noticed that you and the NHI website have some of the same pictures. Did you both perform surgeries on these people? A: All of the patients that appear on the Bernstein Medical website were operated on by me personally. My […]

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After Hair Transplant Does Hair Grow in Stages?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 30th, 2007

Q: I had my first hair transplant of 1100 grafts five months ago. The hair has been growing in well and I am very satisfied with the progress, but the new growth appears to occur in different cycles. Some of the hair never fell out and started growing within weeks. At around three months, a lot more started to grow, and now there seems to be even more growth of new hair coming in its finer stages. Is it normal for transplanted hair to begin growing at different times? Why does some hair come in looking thick and other hair start off finer and then gradually thicken up?

A: You are describing accurately how hair grows after a hair transplant. After the hair restoration procedure, the transplanted stubble is shed and the hair goes into a dormant phase. Several months later, growth begins as fine, vellus hair that thickens over time. The hair usually does not have its original thickness right away.

Typically, growth occurs in waves so that initially some areas will have more hair than others. Over the course of a year the cycles will even out and the hair will thicken to its final diameter.

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What Makes Eyebrow Transplant Different From Other Hair Transplants?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 9th, 2007

Q: I have had thinning eyebrows since my early twenties (I am now 32) and they have gotten to the point that I can’t make them look good with mascara anymore. I am considering an eyebrow hair transplant, how is it different from other hair transplants? A: Eyebrow hair restoration procedures are similar to hair […]

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Will Hair Transplant Grow Slower in Crown than Front of Scalp and Will Hair Grow More Slowly After Second Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 4th, 2007

Q: I had my second hair restoration procedure nearly 5 months back. New hair in the front part of the head is growing well, but the crown is growing slow. Is this common? Also does the new hair grow more slowly after second hair transplant procedure? A: Yes, it is typical for hair in the […]

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After Hair Transplant When Can One Start Massaging Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 23rd, 2007

Q: I had a hair transplant 4 days ago and am feeling itchy in the area where I have my grafts. When can I start massaging the area? A: You can massage at 10 days post-op, as the grafts are firmly in place by this time, but I would not scratch the area for several […]

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After Hair Transplant, How Long Until One Can Resume Smoking?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 11th, 2007

Q: I had my hair transplant done 10 days back, I was a regular smoker (8-10) cigarettes everyday from last 10 years. I have stopped smoking from the day of my surgery, how long should I stop smoking after surgery? A: I would wait a minimum of 10 days, but the longer the better. The […]

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Is it Possible to Lose Hair Transplant Grafts Without Bleeding?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 5th, 2007

Q: Five days after my hair transplant I shampooed, rubbing the transplanted area vigorously using my finger tips and all the scabs fell off. Is it possible I have dislodged some of the grafts even though they didn’t bleed? If there was no bleeding, is it enough to assume all the new transplanted follicles stayed […]

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Can Hair Transplant Treat Early Hair Loss for Person in Early 20s?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 4th, 2007

Q: I am in my early 20′s and I was told my hair loss pattern is a Norwood Class 6, on its way to becoming a Class 7. My hair is brown in color and medium to coarse and I was told I have high density in my donor area. Although I was told I […]

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What Age is Appropriate for Hair Transplant in Person With Early Hair Loss?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 30th, 2007

Q: My hair is receding in the front corners and I have a spot in the crown. I am 22 years old. I’ve been thinking of hair transplants for the past few years and I am 100% sure I want to take this step. I don’t go anywhere without my hat. I hate it. Should […]

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Why Change from Sutures to Surgical Staples in FUT Hair Transplant Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 19th, 2007

Q: I recall that you wrote an article about Monocryl for the donor closure in hair transplants. Why are you now using staples? — R.S., Park Slope, NY

A: I have been using staples in almost all of our follicular unit hair transplants since the beginning of 2006. Continue reading for the detailed explanation as to why I made the switch from sutures to staples.

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In Your Hair Transplant Procedures, Do You Do Megasessions or Very Large Graft Sessions?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 16th, 2007

Q: Some surgeons are doing hair transplants using 5,000 to 6,000 grafts in a single surgery. Looking at the cases in your photo gallery, it seems like your hair transplants involve many fewer grafts per surgery. Do you do such large graft numbers in a single hair restoration procedure? A: The goal in surgical hair […]

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Do You Use Sutures or Staples in FUT Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 22nd, 2007

Q: Can you please comment on the use of sutures verses staples in hair restoration procedures? A: Sutures are great on non-hair bearing skin and allow perfect approximation of the wound edges, but on the scalp they can cause damage to hair follicles below the skin’s surface. The reason is that a running (continuous) suture […]

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Can Hair Transplant Restore Hairline in 21 Year Old With Early Hair Loss?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 16th, 2007

Q: Hi, I am a 21 year old male experiencing the first signs of hair loss as of late. I looked at your before and after pictures of hair transplant patients and honestly right now I have a lot more hair than the patients, even in the after photos. By no means do I intend […]

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What is Size of Donor Strip in FUT Hair Transplantation?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 14th, 2007

Q: Can you give me an idea of the average width of a donor strip, i.e. the actual width taken from the back of your scalp for a hair transplant? A: The average donor strip is 1cm wide, although this will vary depending on the patient’s scalp laxity, density, and the number of grafts desired […]

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What Are Consequences of Trichophytic Closure in FUT Hair Transplant and Infection of Donor Area?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 2nd, 2007

Q: Could you tell me in case there is an infection at the donor area following a hair transplant, will it prevent the hair to grow after healing if the donor area closed by Trichophytic Closure? What are the problems which may the infection cause? A: Infection may cause the donor incision to heal more […]

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After Hair Transplant, Can Hairline be Lowered Further with Second Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 16th, 2007

Q: In my first hair transplantation procedure, I wanted to be as conservative as possible and focus on thickening the thinning hair on top of my head and lowering the hairline minimally. Is it still possible to lower the hairline further in a second hair restoration procedure? Is there an “ideal” time period for a […]

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After Hair Transplant, How Does One Care for Scabbing on Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 26th, 2006

Q: I had a follicular unit hair transplant 5 days ago and my scalp is very scabby. Is there something that I can do to make it look better? A: Before you go to bed, take a long shower and shampoo during the shower for at least 5 minutes, with a very thorough rinsing. As […]

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Can Hair Transplant Correct Hair Loss From Facelift?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 15th, 2006

Q: I have had a minor facelift operation and have lost a bit of hair. Have you heard of this before? The areas around the scars are the most effected. What treatments are best for this? A: Hair loss after a brow, or face lift, is quite common. If it is cosmetically bothersome, a localized […]

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In FUT Hair Transplant, How Important Are Microscopes?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 7th, 2006

Q: I went to a hair transplant doctor for a consultation for my hair loss and he said that it was not that important to use microscopes for hair transplants. I had heard that it was. What’s the deal? A: It is extremely important to use microscopes when performing hair transplants. It is the only […]

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After Hair Transplant, How Long Before Grafts Permanently Root?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 4th, 2006

Q: I had hair transplant surgery 10 days ago and have since developed what looks like big, dry flakes in the transplant area. How long does it take for the grafts to root, and is it okay that some of the grafts fall out when brushing my hair back carefully at this point? Also, the […]

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What are Typical Hair Transplant Results?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 27th, 2006

Q: I know that I can’t get all of my hair back, but what can I realistically expect from the best hair transplants? A: You can expect the follicular unit hair transplant procedure to be perfectly natural, that the hair restoration will be completed in one or two sessions and you should anticipate a quick […]

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Why Should Hair Transplant Doctor Measure Miniaturization in Donor Area Before Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 17th, 2006

Q: Why should a doctor measure miniaturization in the donor area before recommending a hair transplant? A: Normally, the donor area contains hairs of very uniform diameter (called terminal hairs). In androgenetic hair loss, the action of DHT causes some of these terminal hairs to decrease in diameter and in length until they eventually disappear […]

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After Hair Transplant, What Happens if Transplanted Area is Injured?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 23rd, 2006

Q: I am a patient of yours who had a hair transplantation procedure done mostly in the crown area and in the front about seven months ago. The hair is just starting to come in nicely and is starting to fill in the bald spots. Yesterday I carelessly banged the top of my head against […]

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After a Hair Transplant, What is Post-op Wound Dressing Like and How Soon Can One Shower?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 17th, 2006

Q I had a friend that had to wear a turban-like bandage on his head for a week after his hair transplant, but his procedure was a number of years ago. What is the post-op dressing like now and how soon can you shower after a hair transplant procedure? A: Patients leave the office after […]

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Can You Perform Hair Transplant with Curly Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 6th, 2006

Q: I have curly hair with thinning on top and strong, but less curly hair on the sides and back. My hairline is receding, but it is really the area on top I am concerned about. Does hair replacement work with curly hair and will it match? A: Yes, curly hair grows as well after […]

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Is a Hair Transplant Painful and What Kind of Anesthesia do You Use?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 10th, 2006

Q: Dr. Bernstein, is a follicular unit hair transplant, the way you perform it, very painful? A: We perform our hair transplant procedures using long-acting, local anesthesia, so after the initial injections, the patient doesn’t experience any pain or discomfort. The local anesthesia (a combination of Lidocaine and Marcaine) lasts about 4-5 hours. For long […]

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What is Best Hair Transplant Density and do You Measure Maximum or Overall Hair Density?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 9th, 2006

Q: Dear Dr. Bernstein, a full head of hair averages ~100 FU/cm2. To achieve the appearance of fullness with a hair transplant 50% is required. In one of your articles you say that you recommend 25 FU / cm2 to your patients. Is that the density per one session or the final one? If that […]

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How Long is Hair Transplant Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 2nd, 2006

Q: Hair transplantation sounds like a really time-consuming procedure. How long does the hair transplant actually take? A: An average hair transplant, that involves the movement of 1,500 to 2,500 grafts, can take a team of up to six people, five to eight hours. Surgical hair restoration is a very time-consuming, labor intensive process, where […]

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What is History of Hair Transplant Procedures?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 31st, 2006

Q: Dr. Bernstein, I remember Senator William Proxmire. He was one of the first sort of high-profile people who had a hair transplant probably, what, thirty years ago, and to be honest with you, it wasn’t all that great. It looked kind of funny. Have we made any progress in the last twenty-five, thirty years? […]

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Does Hair Transplant Prevent Hair Loss?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 27th, 2006

Q: How does a hair transplant prevent hair loss? A: It doesn’t. Surgical hair restoration does just what it says. It restores hair to an area where the hair has been lost (by borrowing it from an area of greater density that is less important cosmetically, such as the back of the scalp). To prevent, […]

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Is Success of Hair Transplant Affected by Age or Scalp Fibrosis?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 11th, 2006

Q: It is my understanding that as a person loses his or her hair, the skin of the scalp undergoes a number of changes, namely there is a loss of fat, an increase in cellular atrophy, and of course the dreaded perifollicular fibrosis (now that’s a mouthful). It seems to me that these changes, in […]

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What is Benefit of Staples in Closing Hair Transplant Donor Incision?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 7th, 2006

Q: I have heard that staples are uncomfortable after the hair transplant, why do doctors use them? A: Staples are used for two main reasons. The first is that being made of stainless steel; they don’t react with the skin and, therefore, cause little inflammation. The second is that, unlike sutures which are used with […]

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Can One Be Too Old for Hair Transplant Surgery?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 6th, 2006

Q: Is there ever an age where you are too old for a hair transplant? A: One can be too young for surgical hair restoration, but not too old (as long as one is in good health medically). Older people generally make excellent candidates for hair transplantation since their expectations are generally more realistic and […]

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Can One Have Hair Transplant if Scalp is Tight from Prior Surgery?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 5th, 2006

Q: What can be done if I want to have a hair transplant and my scalp is very tight from prior surgeries? A: Follicular Unit Extraction is ideal in very tight scalps, provided that there is enough hair to extract without leaving the donor area too thin and provided that the follicles are not too […]

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How Do You Determine Size of Hair Transplant Donor Strip?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 3rd, 2006

Q: I am interested in FUT. How do you figure out how large a strip to use for the hair restoration when transplanting all follicular units? A: The length of the donor strip incision is determined by the number of follicular unit grafts required for the hair restoration. There are slightly less than 100 follicular […]

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What Causes Poor Hair Growth After Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 28th, 2006

Q I had a hair transplant 15 months ago at a well known clinic in Manhattan. There were about 1000 grafts transplanted in the front hair line. At this point I am upset with my results. My guess is that only about 50 new hairs have grown. My question is what would cause this to […]

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Where is Optimal Donor Incision for FUT Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 23rd, 2006

Q: I have heard that the hair for a hair transplant is taken from the back and sides of the scalp. Where exactly is the best place to remove the hair from? A: You are correct. The best place to put the donor incision is in the mid-part of the permanent zone located in the […]

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Why is Strip Harvesting in Hair Transplant Procedure Still Popular?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 21st, 2006

Q: Why are strips used so much in a hair transplant when there is now Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE)? A: Strip harvesting is used in the majority of hair transplant procedures because it allows the surgeon the ability to perform hair transplant sessions using large numbers of grafts while minimizing injury to the patient’s hair […]

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Does Hair Transplant Donor Area Decrease in Size Over Time?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 16th, 2006

Q: I am 22 and want to go for hair transplantation. I want hair restoration surgery now because I have a concern about my donor area that it might diminish if I postponed my transplantation. Could this be the case? A: The logic is not correct. Having a hair transplant at an early age does […]

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What is Trichophytic Closure After FUT Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 14th, 2006

Q: I have read that some doctors perform something called a trichophytic closure. What is this? A: A trichophytic closure is a way to minimize the appearance of the donor scar in a hair transplant using a strip incision. The technique entails cutting the off the top of one of the wound edges and suturing […]

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What is Tumescent Anesthesia and is it Used in Hair Transplant Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 31st, 2006

Q: I have read about something called “tumescent anesthesia” but didn’t understand what it is. What exactly is it? A: Tumescent techniques were first popularized in liposuction surgery where large quantities of fluid containing adrenalin were injected into the person’s fat layer to decrease bleeding before the fat was literally sucked out of the body. […]

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Before Hair Transplant, Should One Cut Their Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 6th, 2006

Q: Should I cut my hair prior to the hair transplant? A: It is easier for the hair transplant surgeon and his team to work when the existing hair in the area to be transplanted is cut short, but a skilled surgeon can work well in either situation. Most experienced surgeons are used to working […]

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What is Graft Compression in a Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 22nd, 2006

Q: What exactly is compression in a hair transplant? A: Compression refers to the visible tufting of grafts due to the contraction of the grafts from the normal elasticity of skin around it, after it has been inserted into the recipient site. Compression is most commonly seen when minigrafts are used in the hair restoration […]

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Should I Have Hair Transplant and Use Hairpiece?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 18th, 2006

Q: What is your opinion on having a hair transplant to restore the hairline and then wearing a hair system behind it to regain the appearance of a full head of hair? K.Y. – Hackensack, New Jersey A: It is my personal feeling that one should not use a hair transplant to supplement a hair […]

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Will Multiple FUT Hair Transplants Leave Multiple Donor Scars?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 9th, 2006

Q: I understand that even if you have multiple hair transplants you will only be left with one scar in the donor area. A: If the closure is performed without tension, each procedure should result in the same fine scar. The best-placed incision is in the mid-portion of the permanent donor area. Since there is […]

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How Many Hair Transplant Grafts Will Give Best Results and Do Megasessions Yield Best Cosmetic Benefit?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 22nd, 2006

Q: There is such a big deal made on the chats about people getting Megasessions of over 4000 grafts per session. When I look at the pictures on your website, the results look great, but I am surprised that not many grafts were used compared to what is being talked about. A: My goal is […]

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Will Hair Transplant be Detectable Immediately After Surgery and What is Typical Appearance Post-op?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 16th, 2006

Q: Is it possible to have a hair transplant that is totally undetectable immediately following surgery? A: Not unless a person has a fair amount of existing hair that can cover the transplanted area. Although surgical hair restoration techniques have improved dramatically over the past ten years, and wounds are so small that patients may […]

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Can Hair Transplant Procedure Remove Hair From One Person and Transplant to Another?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 25th, 2006

Q: Can hair be transplanted from one person to another? A: A hair transplant between individuals can only be performed on identical twins, since they are genetically the same. In all other cases, including non-identical siblings, the transplanted hair will be rejected. We are often asked how it is that one can perform kidney transplants […]

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After Hair Transplant, Will Scalp Laxity Return to Normal and, if so, How Long After Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 6th, 2006

Q: After a strip procedure, will the scalps laxity return to normal and how long after the hair transplant does it take? A: The scalp regains most of its laxity in the first eight months following the hair transplant, but it will continue to loosen slightly after that. It is interesting that if the scalp […]

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What Factors Determine Hair Transplant Graft Count?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 4th, 2006

Q: Is it possible to tell me roughly how many grafts would be left from donor area if one had a hair transplant of 2,500 grafts and had a density of around 2.0? G.H. – New York, NY A: How much hair can be harvested in total depends upon a number of factors besides donor […]

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How Long Until One Sees Growth from Hair Transplant into Donor Scar?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 29th, 2005

Q: I have had some grafts implanted into a donor scar. How long does it take to see the final result? A: In normal scalps, growth is generally complete by 10-12 months. Grafts placed in scar tissue may often take longer to grow.

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What Causes Hair Transplant Graft Popping During Surgical Hair Restoration?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 21st, 2005

Q: What causes graft popping during a hair transplant? A: Popping, or the tendency for grafts to elevate after they have been placed into the recipient area, is caused by a number of factors including: Packing the grafts too closely, particularly when they are placed on a very acute (sharp) angle with the skin Rough […]

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Will Hair Transplant Grafts Grow in Scar Tissue on Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on December 6th, 2005

Q: Can hair transplants grow in scars? A: Grafts will grow in scar tissue as long as the scar is not thickened. However, they cannot be placed as close together as in normal scalp because of decreased blood flow. When performing a hair transplant into scar tissue, it is often necessary to perform the hair […]

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After Hair Transplant, Can Donor Hair Become Frizzy and Dry?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 18th, 2005

Q: Why can donor hair become frizzy and dry once transplanted? A: Frizzing and kinkiness is a temporary phenomenon that is part of the normal healing process after a follicular unit hair transplant. During the healing process, the new collagen that forms around the grafts can alter their growth. Over time, usually within a year, […]

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Can Hair Transplant be Harmed by Smoking Before or After Procedure?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 10th, 2005

Q: Is it true that smoking is bad for a hair transplant and why? A: Smoking causes constriction of blood vessels and decreased blood flow to the scalp, predominantly due to its nicotine content. Also, carbon monoxide in smoke decreases the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. These factors both contribute to poor wound healing […]

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Can Shock from Hair Transplant Make One Lose Healthy Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on November 1st, 2005

Q: Will the shock of a hair transplant make me lose my existing healthy hair and is it permanent? A: In general, only miniaturized hair (the hair that is affected by androgens and that has begun to decrease in diameter) is shed after a transplant. This hair would be lost in the near term anyway. […]

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After Hair Transplant, What is Normal Amount of Shedding?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 21st, 2005

Q: I had a hair transplant two weeks ago and I just started noticing that some grafts were in my baseball cap at the end of the day. Am I losing the transplant and what can I do to keep this from happening? A: The follicles are firmly fixed in the scalp 10 days following […]

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Can Hair Transplant be Performed on Scar Tissue from Prior Surgery?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 13th, 2005

Q: I have had some surgical procedures on my head that left a fair amount of scar tissue. Can hair grow there? Is it a more difficult procedure? Are there any complications? A: Transplanted hair will grow in scar tissue as long as the tissue is not thickened. Thickened scar tissue can be flattened with […]

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What is Effect of Multiple Hair Transplant Procedures on Scalp?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 12th, 2005

Q: I have had 4 hair transplants with strips taken out for a total of 2600 grafts over 15 years. The last one was 1,650 grafts. My doc says my donor site is good for a few more but I think it has been probably stretched to its max. Is it believable that the skin […]

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Is There a Second Scar with Second FUT Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 7th, 2005

Q: When a second hair transplant is performed, should there be a second incision or should it be incorporated into the first? A: It is a very common practice to make a second separate scar in the second hair restoration procedure. This is done to maximize the hair in the second session, and it is […]

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Hair Transplant Starting with Crown?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 5th, 2005

Q: What are your thoughts on performing a hair transplant to the crown first? A: It depends upon the person’s age, how bald he is likely to become, and the donor supply. As a general rule, the crown should not be transplanted in a younger person (under 30) as the extent of his balding is […]

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Do You Use Anesthesia During Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on October 5th, 2005

Q: Will I be unconscious during the hair transplant procedure and do you use general anesthesia? A: All of the surgical hair restoration procedures at Bernstein Medical are performed under local anesthesia. The fact that general anesthesia is not needed is what makes hair transplant procedures – even though they are long – very safe. […]

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How Does Hair Transplant Work?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 22nd, 2005

Q: Why does a hair transplant work? A: Hair transplantation works because hair taken from the permanent zone in the back and sides of the scalp maintains its original characteristics when transplanted to a new place in the balding area in the top of the head. This property of hair is called “donor dominance” and […]

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Can Hair Transplant Grow Hair Over Scar From Injury?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 15th, 2005

Q: I have a scar on the top of my head the size of a quarter from an old injury. I would like hair to grow back on the bald spot. Can a hair transplant re-grow hair on the spot and not have any scar on my head at all? A: Traumatic scars are readily […]

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What is "Shock Fall Out" After Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 8th, 2005

Q: What is “shock fall out”? A: Shedding after a hair transplant is also referred to by the very ominous sounding term “shock fall out.” The correct medical term is “effluvium” which literally means shedding. It is usually the miniaturized hair (i.e. the hair that is at the end of its lifespan due to genetic […]

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How Much Donor Hair Harvesting is Enough for Hair Transplant, How Much is Too Much?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on September 2nd, 2005

Q: When harvesting donor hair, how does the surgeon know when to stop? A: First, the patient must decide the shortest length he/she is comfortable wearing his/her hair. Additional hair can be removed — whether through Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) or Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) — as long as, at this length, the back and […]

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Can Hair Transplant Correct Hair Loss from Autoimmune Disease Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE)?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 25th, 2005

Q: I have a bald patch on my scalp diagnosed as DLE, can this be corrected with a hair transplant? A: DLE or discoid lupus erythematosus is a type of autoimmune disease where the body produces an inflammatory reaction to components of the skin, causing it to scar and lose hair. The skin in the […]

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Does Hair Grow More Slowly After Second Hair Transplant or After First Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 24th, 2005

Q: This is my second hair transplant and is seems like it is growing more slowly than my first. Is this normal? A: It is common for a second hair transplant to take a bit longer to grow than the first, so this should be expected. It is also possible that there is some shedding […]

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What is Graft Compression After Hair Transplant and Why Does it Occur?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 19th, 2005

Q: What is graft compression? A: Graft compression refers to a tufted look resulting from the contraction of grafts caused by the normally elastic skin that contracts around the graft as the hair transplant heals. This was a common occurrence with mini-micrografting where 5 or more hairs from two or more follicular units were placed […]

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In FUT Hair Transplant, How Many Grafts in Average Donor Strip?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 16th, 2005

Q: If I had a hair transplant using Follicular Unit Transplantation, how many grafts would be in a 15cm by 1cm donor strip, on average? A: In a person with average donor density there are approximately 100 follicular units per square centimeter. A 15cm long strip would have slightly less than 1500 grafts due to […]

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After Hair Transplant, What is Lump on Scalp Beneath Donor Area?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 12th, 2005

Q: I have developed a rather large, hard lump beneath the skin at the base of my scalp in the donor area that I first noticed this about two or three weeks after my hair transplant. What is this? A: You are describing an enlarged lymph node, a condition commonly seen as a normal part […]

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Hair Transplant for Thinning Hair on Crown?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on August 11th, 2005

Q: Should you perform a hair transplant on a crown that is just starting to thin? A: A “thin” crown should first be treated with Propecia, as it may thicken the hair to a cosmetically acceptable degree without the need for surgery. If Propecia is ineffective in restoring enough hair, then surgical hair restoration can […]

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How Long After Hair Transplant Can Grafts Fall Out?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 29th, 2005

Q: How do you know if you have lost any grafts after a hair transplant and how long after the hair transplant can you still lose them? A: Each day following the hair restoration, the transplanted grafts become more fixed in the scalp and the hairs in the grafts become more dissociated (loose). At nine […]

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In FUT Hair Transplant, What Percentage of Telogen Phase Follicles on Donor Strip Wasted?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 14th, 2005

Q: When a donor strip is taken out during a hair transplant and separated under the microscope, you can read on the internet that there is a wastage of grafts (about 15%), because of those unseen telogen hairs. What do you think about that and how does it affect the hair restoration? A: The Telogen […]

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Can Hair Transplant Restore Original Hair Fullness?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on July 5th, 2005

Q: Can you get your original density back with a hair transplant? A: Although the cosmetic benefit can be dramatic, a hair transplant only “moves” rather than creates new hair. In surgical hair restoration, a limited amount of hair from the donor area is transplanted to a much larger area in the front and top […]

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After FUT Hair Transplant, Can One Travel on Airplane with Surgical Staples?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 28th, 2005

Q: I’ll be traveling from New York to Cincinnati the week after my hair transplant. Will I be able to get through airport security if I have staples? A: Yes. Although the staples that we use to close the donor area after hair transplant or restoration procedures are made of stainless steel, they are too […]

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What Causes Poor Hair Transplant Growth?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 20th, 2005

Q: Do you ever see poor growth from a hair transplant? A: The situations where I have encountered poor growth are: 1) When hair is transplanted to areas of skin that has been thickened due to the prior placement of larger grafts or plugs (this is called “hyperfibrotic thickening”). Removal of the larger grafts can […]

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After Hair Transplant, What is Recommendation on Removeable Hair Piece?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on June 15th, 2005

Q: What are your recommendations for wearing a hairpiece following a hair transplant? A: First, some clarification. It is OK to wear a “hair piece” (one that is attached to the hair with clips or to the scalp with tape) so that it can be removed each night, but NOT a “hair system” (that is […]

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Can One Have Hair Transplant with Fine Hair?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 31st, 2005

Q: My hair is fine. Is that a problem for a hair transplant? A: Fine hair will give a thinner look than thicker hair, but will look completely natural. Thin hair doesn’t prevent one from having surgical hair restoration, providing your donor density and scalp laxity are adequate. These would need to be measured.

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How are Hair Transplant Recipient Sites Made?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on May 27th, 2005

Q: How are recipient sites made? A: At Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration we use a series of custom made, ultra-fine blades to create recipient sites. The blades differ in size by only one tenth of a millimeter and range from 0.6mm for one-hair follicular units to 1.2mm for 4-hair follicular units. At […]

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What Age is Best for a Hair Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on April 21st, 2005

Q: If my hair is just starting to thin, when should l have my first hair transplant? A: It is best to wait until at least 25 before considering hair restoration surgery, although there are exceptions. The most important thing is to wait until you have hair loss that is a cosmetic problem. A hair […]

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In Hair Transplant, What is Effect of Dense Packing on Grafts?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on March 8th, 2005

Q: Does dense packing hurt grafts? A: There is no absolute answer to this question. In a hair transplant, dense packing has a risk of decreasing yield if there is a significant amount of photo damage to the scalp (which alters the blood supply) and if there is a tendency for the grafts to pop […]

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Can You Perform Hair Transplant into Scar Tissue?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on February 1st, 2005

Q: Can you perform a hair transplant into scar tissue? A.H. – Rockland County, New York A: Yes, hair grows in scar tissue, but not quite as well as in normal tissue. The scar is not as elastic as normal tissue so the grafts are at slightly higher risk of being dislodged; therefore, more care […]

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After Hair Transplant, How Long Should One Wait Before Second Transplant?

Posted by Robert M. Bernstein M.D. on January 18th, 2005

Q: If a second hair transplant is performed before the first had a chance to grow could the second procedure destroy the follicles from the first? A: Hair from the second hair transplant session would not damage the follicles transplanted in the first session, even if follicular unit grafts were transplanted in exactly the same […]

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