Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
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Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
Hair Restoration Answers

Is a Hair Transplant Possible Using Someone Else’s Hair?

Q: Can you do a hair transplant using someone else’s hair? — K.K., Garden City, N.Y.

A: Unfortunately, this is not possible because your body would reject the hair transplant without the use of immunosuppressive drugs. The problem with immune suppressants is that they will lower your natural immune response, increasing your susceptibility to infections and even cancer, and you’ll have to take them for the rest of your life.

A transplant using someone else’s hair is also not desirable for aesthetic reasons. There’s the style of the hair, its texture, thickness, color, etc. Trying to find the perfect donor whose hair would complement and flatter your particular features and blend in with your remaining hair would be a significant, if not impossible, challenge. It would be possible, however, to transplant the hair from one identical twin to another, but most likely if one went bald, so would the other.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Does Surgeon Determine Angle of Hair In Hair Transplant?

Q: I notice that some patients end up with hair that seems to stand straight up while others have hair that flows to one side or the other. Does the angle at which you place the follicles in the scalp ultimately determine how the hair will lie? Is there some artistic talent needed when placing these follicles so that patients end up with hair that lies flat or sticks straight up? What determines this? Do we have control over it? — H.B., Fort Lauderdale, F.L.

A: Great question. You are correct, the angle of the recipient sites largely determines the hair direction. Hair should be planted the way it grows (i.e., in a forward and horizontal direction at the frontal hairline.) It is extremely important that it is transplanted that way to look natural. The body will alter the angle a bit as it heals, usually elevating it slightly and re-creating any prior wave (yes, waves are determined by the scalp, rather than by the hair follicles per se). In a properly performed hair transplant, a straight-up appearance should be due to grooming, it should not have been a result of the actual procedure. Hair should never be transplanted perpendicular to the scalp. I discussed these important concepts way back in my 1997 paper “The Aesthetics of Follicular Transplantation“.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

CBS News Report On Robotic FUE Features Dr. Bernstein

CBS News Report On Robotic FUE Features Dr. BernsteinDr. Bernstein was featured in a CBS News report on robotic hair transplantation. During Dr. Max Gomez’s visit to the Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration, Dr. Bernstein discusses with Dr. Gomez the difference between FUT and FUE hair transplants, how the robotic system works, and the benefits of extracting hair follicles using robotic FUE rather than by traditional hand-held methods.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Do You Perform Hair Transplants With Body Or Leg Hair?

Q: Dr. Bernstein, can you please comment on leg and body hair transplants? — J.R., Ridgewood, NJ

A: I’ve tried the technique in the past but have been dissatisfied with the results. Scalp hair, unlike the rest of the body, has multiple hairs rising out of each follicle. With leg and body hair, you have only one hair per follicle, not follicular units of multiple hairs. Leg hair is also very fine. It might thicken up a little bit after it is transplanted, but not enough to be clinically useful. In men you want full thickness hair, so fine hair can make it look like it is miniaturizing, as it does when you’re losing it.

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Hair Restoration Answers

What Part of FUE Hair Transplant is Performed by ARTAS Robotic System?

Q: With the ARTAS robotic system, by Restoration Robotics, what part of the FUE hair transplant procedure can actually be done by the robot? — A.M., Los Angeles, CA

A: The ARTAS System is a computer guided method of harvesting follicular units in the donor area during FUE. The initial phase of FUE, where the follicles are selected, scored and separated from the surrounding scalp is done by the ARTAS System. All other phases of the procedure including; actual follicular unit graft removal from the scalp, hairline design, recipient site creation and placement of the grafts into the balding scalp are done by the surgical team.

In the near future, improvements in the ARTAS System should allow it to be able to actually extract the separated grafts from the scalp. Eventually, the engineers hope to be able to increase the capability of the system so that it can create recipient sites and implant the extracted grafts into them.

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Hair Restoration Answers

How Can I Make a Hair Transplant Less Obvious Post-op?

Q: I am considering a hair transplant and would like to have the procedure and not be overly obvious about it. What are my options in hiding or concealing any redness after a week or so after the hair restoration? — R.T., Manhattan, NY

A: There are a number of factors that can make a hair transplant obvious in the post-op period. These include the redness that you are asking about, but also crusting and swelling.

Redness after hair restoration surgery is easily camouflaged with ordinary make-up. At one week post-op, the grafts are pretty secure, so that make-up can be applied and then gently washed off at the end of the day. Since the recipient wounds are well healed by one week, using make-up does not increase the risk of infection. At 10 days after the hair transplant, the grafts are permanent and cannot be dislodged, therefore, at this time the makeup can be removed without any special precautions.

Usually, residual crusting (scabbing) presents more of a cosmetic problem than redness, but can be minimized with meticulous post-op care. Crusts form when the blood or serum that oozes from recipient sites after the procedure dries on the scalp. Although it is relatively easy to prevent scabs from forming with frequent washing of the scalp after the surgery, once the scabs harden they are difficult to remove without dislodging the grafts.

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Hair Restoration Answers

How Do You Make Recipient Sites in a Hair Transplant?

Q: How do you make the recipient sites in a hair transplant? — N.P., New Delhi, India

A: I make the recipient sites using 19-, 20-, 21- and 22-gauge needles. The higher the number, the finer the needle. The hairline is done with a 21-gauge, which is really very tiny. Eyebrow sites are created with a 22-. When one draws blood in a routine blood test, an 18-g needle is used and, of course, there are no residual marks. The instruments we use are significantly finer than this.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Start Propecia Before Hair Loss Consultation?

Q: I am a 34 year old male and my dermatologist prescribed Propecia for me today. Most of my hair loss is at the hairline, but there is some loss on top as well. It’s not bad, I just want to stay ahead of it. If I get a transplant I want to get it at your clinic, but I will give the Propecia a try first. I am going to be overseas for a couple of months starting this Sunday and I was wondering about the necessity or desirability of having someone measure my hair density prior to starting the Propecia. Would you advise waiting to start the Propecia until I come back in two months and having my density examined at your clinic? — M.R., Great Falls, Virginia

A: I would start Propecia as soon as possible. What is important for a hair transplant is the density in the donor area and this is not affected by Propecia (or minoxidil). Your donor density can be measured anytime at an evaluation prior to surgery. If you want to wait to see the effects of Propecia prior to the hair transplant, you really should wait a year; since growth, if any, can take this long. If you just want to have Propecia on board for the hair restoration procedure, or to make sure you don’t have side effects, then generally a month will do. If you would like to do a photo consult through our website to get some preliminary information about how many grafts you might need, you can do that at your leisure, but start Propecia now since the longer you wait the less effective it will be at regrowing hair.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Is A Hair Transplant For Women Different Or More Difficult Than One For Men?

Q: Is the hair transplant for women different from the one for men? Anything easier? Anything more difficult?

A: Women’s hairlines are far more complex than men’s as the hair in a women’s hairline often creates subtle swirls and directional changes. These must be mimicked in the surgical design for the hair transplant to look natural.

In women, we are more often working in and around existing hair, as most women that seek hair transplantation are thinning rather than bald. This slows down the graft insertion steps and makes the procedure take a bit longer compared to men.

Read more about hair loss in women or see before/after photos in our Women’s Hair Transplant Gallery.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

Celebrity Hair Transplant Procedures An Increasingly Hot Topic

Celebrity Hair Transplants - Kevin Costner

Celebrity hair loss is becoming an increasingly hot topic in the media. The continuing demands on celebrities to keep their good looks, seems to be of great interest to the tabloids. This is evidenced by the recent interest in the hairlines of stars like John Cleese, Mel Gibson, John Travolta, Kevin Costner, Dennis Miller, Tom Arnold, Johnny Depp, Jude Law, David Beckham, Matt Lauer, Tiger Woods, Tom Brady, and many others.

Interest in celebrity hair transplants is not just reserved for film and TV stars, but for all kinds of professions in the public eye. Read on for the full article about celebrity hair transplant procedures.

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Hair Restoration Answers

In Follicular Unit Hair Transplant, Can You Double-up Follicular Units and Still Call it FUT?

Q: Could you accept easing of the very strict definition of FUT, which you published about 15 years ago? Could you agree to use mixture of single FU and double FU under the name of FUT? — N.W., Huntington, N.Y.

A: One would never want grafts larger than the largest original follicular units or the results will not look natural. The artificially large grafts will stand out in relatively thin surroundings. If one were to try to fix this by transplanting the doubled FUs very close together (over one or more sessions) one risks running out of grafts for other areas of the scalp. In other words, you can’t fool mother nature.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Areas of Unethical Behavior Practiced Today

Note from Dr. Bernstein: This article, by my colleague Dr. Rassman, is such important reading for anyone considering a hair transplant, that I felt it should be posted here in its entirety.

Areas of Unethical Behavior Practiced Today
William Rassman, MD, Los Angeles, California

I am disturbed that there is a rise in unethical practices in the hair transplant community. Although many of these practices have been around amongst a small handful of physicians, the recent recession has clearly increased their numbers. Each of us can see evidence of these practices as patients come into our offices and tell us about their experiences. When a patient comes to me and is clearly the victim of unethical behavior I can only react by telling the patient the truth about what my fellow physician has done to them. We have no obligation to protect those doctors in our ranks who practice unethically, so maybe the way we respond is to become a patient advocate, one on one, for each patient so victimized.

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Hair Restoration Answers

After an FUE Hair Transplant at the Hairline, Will Bumps Go Away?

Q: I have had a hair transplant done in the hairline of 1,000 or so FUE grafts. However, as the hair sheds, under natural light the recipient skin seems bumpy with incisions and holes that are noticeable. Do these tend to go away with time once they have healed? — S.S., Glencoe, I.L.

A: If a follicular unit transplant is performed properly (using either extraction or a strip) there should be no bumps or surface irregularities. When the hair restoration is totally healed, the recipient area should be appear as normal looking skin.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Is a Hair Transplant to Recreate a Dense Hairline Too Good to be True?

Q: It’s a question that greatly concerns me because I’m investigating getting a transplant sometime next year. I’m 28 and thought I started balding at 26, but photographic evidence suggests it had started somewhere around age 24. I’m roughly a Class 2 now, and thanks to finasteride, I’ve stayed almost exactly where I was at 26 with some improvement (not really cosmetically significant though). However, I am convinced I have some crown and top of the scalp thinning too, but not to a visible degree.

These people getting these miraculous jobs from Canada – it is a trick, right? They can’t honestly expect to be able to get away with what they’ve done over the course of their entire lives, can they? — L.M., Great Falls, V.A.

A: I think you have better insights into hair loss than many hair transplant surgeons. ABI was the “rare” patient who seems to be a stable Class 3. I made that judgment due to: almost no miniaturization at the border of his Class 3 recession, no crown miniaturization, and his unusual family history. He had several older family members who stayed at Class 3 their whole lives.

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Hair Restoration Answers

What Happened with Joe Biden’s “Pluggy” Hair Transplant and What Repair Strategy Do You Suggest?

Q: What’s the story with Joe Biden’s hair? — R.B., Inwood, N.Y.

A: Joe Biden — former Senator from Delaware and now the Vice President of the United States — apparently had a hair transplant many years ago using the older hair restoration techniques. This included not only transplanting hair in large plugs (corn rows), but using them to create a broad frontal hairline; a design that generally does not look natural as a person ages.

Also, the older grafts were transplanted in a vertical orientation giving a sprout-like, unnatural appearance.

The use of large plugs and the inefficiencies of the older procedures waste a considerable amount of donor hair, leaving Senator Biden with a dense rim of hair in the front part of his scalp and little coverage behind that.

The repair strategy would consist of removing the larger plugs, microscopically dividing them into smaller grafts (individual follicular units of 1 to 3 hairs each), and then placing the smaller grafts in a more forward direction and in a more natural distribution. This involves using the 1-hair units to soften the frontal hair line and the 2- and 3-hair units to extend the transplant further back on the scalp.

In addition to the hair transplant repair, Biden received significant cosmetic improvement from the natural graying of his hair over the years, as this tends to make the hair appear fuller and any irregularities less noticeable.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Do You Use Digital Imaging to Forecast Hair Transplant Results?

Q: Do you use computer type imaging to create the best way to ensure you (or any hair transplant surgeon) have the same goal or target “picture” of the particular patient’s restoration as that particular patient has as his “picture?” –F.D., Laude, Missouri

A: I prefer not to do imaging since it tends to oversell the hair restoration procedure.

In addition, the technology is unable to accurately represent what the hair transplant will really look like as there are many hair characteristics that it can’t take into account.

Seeing lots of actual photos of hair transplant patients is much more instructive – and more honest (if the photos are taken correctly). At the time of the consult I design the hairline and photograph it.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Does Propecia Affect Beard Growth?

Q: I am a 21 yrs old male having serious hair loss over the last few years. I also have very little facial hair. Since Propecia is a DHT blocker can it inhibit beard growth? — E.M., Astoria, N.Y.

A: As you suggest, it would be reasonable to assume that since DHT stimulates beard growth, blocking DHT (with finasteride) would tend to inhibit its growth. In practice, this does not seem to be the case, i.e. we don’t find that Propecia has any effect on facial hair. The reason is not clear.

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Hair Restoration Answers

How do You Treat Early Hair Loss in Women?

Q: I am a 33 year old women and am just starting to thin on the top of my scalp behind my frontal hairline. What should I do? Should I have a hair transplant?

A: There are a number of things that you should consider that can be effective in early hair loss. These include minoxidil (Rogaine), laser therapy, and using cosmetics specifically made to make the hair appear fuller. Lightening or streaking the hair, as well as parting the hair off to the side, will also make the hair appear fuller.

If a surgical hair restoration is performed too early and there is still a lot of existing hair in the area, the hair transplant may actually accelerate hair loss. Surgery should not be performed prematurely.

Also, it is important that the doctor check the stability of the donor area, using densitometry, to make sure that the procedure is even possible. For those women who are good candidates, and if it is done at the appropriate time, a follicular unit hair transplant is a great procedure that can produce really natural results.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Some Hair Transplant Photos Seem Too Good to be True, Are they Real?

Q: I have seen some incredible photos on some websites. In some cases, they seem too good to be true. Are they real? — P.V., Jersey City, N.J.

A: Evaluating results is more complicated than simply looking at photos – even if they are un-retouched and not studio shots.

For example, if 4,000 grafts were used to make a young person’s hair line look very dense, you might say that was a spectacular result. However, if he only has a total of 6,000 follicular units in his donor area (the average), then he is going to have many problems as he continues to bald, since there will be only 2,000 grafts left for the rest of his head.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can Hair Transplant Restore Hairline in 21 Year Old With Early Hair Loss?

Q: Hi, I am a 21 year old male experiencing the first signs of hair loss as of late. I looked at your before and after pictures of hair transplant patients and honestly right now I have a lot more hair than the patients, even in the after photos. By no means do I intend to criticize your work at all, but I noticed that they still had a receding hairline. I myself am an artist and pay close attention to detail. What I want out of a hair transplantation procedure is to basically have the full head of hair that I had even before puberty. Is it possible for this to be done?

A: Your concerns and goals, although understandable, are impossible to achieve through hair transplantation and is exactly the reason why we don’t perform hair transplants in young persons.

Surgical hair restoration can never give you your original density back since we are just redistributing a smaller amount of hair.

In addition, your original hairline should not be restored since a transplanted hairline is permanent and will not evolve naturally as you age. A mature hairline must be built into the design of the first hair restoration procedure, regardless of a patient’s age.

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Hair Restoration Answers

After Hair Transplant, Can Hairline be Lowered Further with Second Procedure?

Q: In my first hair transplantation procedure, I wanted to be as conservative as possible and focus on thickening the thinning hair on top of my head and lowering the hairline minimally. Is it still possible to lower the hairline further in a second hair restoration procedure? Is there an “ideal” time period for a second hair transplant after the first? — B.B., Meatpacking, N.Y.

A: It is possible to lower the hairline with a second hair transplant, but the doctor must be certain that you have enough donor hair so that the transplanted pattern will look natural long-term.

Unless there is some pressing reason that you had to have a second session sooner, I would wait a minimum of 10-12 months between hair restoration procedures so that you can see the full cosmetic impact of the first session.

As a hair transplant matures and thickens, the hairline will look lower as the eye doesn’t see as far into the scalp.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can You Perform Hair Transplant with Curly Hair?

Q: I have curly hair with thinning on top and strong, but less curly hair on the sides and back. My hairline is receding, but it is really the area on top I am concerned about. Does hair replacement work with curly hair and will it match? — E.B., Sanibel, F.L.

A: Yes, curly hair grows as well after a hair transplant surgery as straight hair.

After the hair restoration, the transplanted hair will take on the characteristics of the hair that was originally in the area, so it will match perfectly with respect to curl and wave.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can a Hair Transplant Restore Frontal Hair Loss in Women?

Q: Although I read that women are supposedly protected from hair loss in the frontal hairline by the enzyme aromatase that is exactly where I am losing hair. My hairline has receded and I have developed a widow’s peak. What can be causing this, and how can I fix it? It seems to have been happening gradually for a few years.

A: Less than 10% of female hair loss is in a frontal pattern that is similar to the pattern of genetic hair loss seen in men.

Women with this pattern can often be good candidates for hair transplant surgery, particularly if the donor area is stable. View our Women’s Hair Transplant Gallery for some examples of the kind of results we can achieve for women at Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration.

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Hair Restoration Answers

After FUE Hair Transplant, Why are there Pimples and Redness?

Q: I had a hair transplant of over 600 grafts using Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) to my frontal hairline and the frontal part of my scalp. The procedure was done less than a year ago by another doctor. Since then I have had persistent pimples and redness in the area that the grafts were placed. Also, the surface of the skin in the area is irregular. — E.Z., Long Island, N.Y.

A: One of the causes of having pimples and redness following Follicular Unit Extraction may be buried hair fragments and there are significantly more hair fragments generated with the two-step FUE technique than with the three-step method.

In the three-step procedure, we use blunt dissection which minimizes transection (cutting of hair follicles) and thus reduces the incidence of hair fragments. See the Three-Step FUE page at the Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration website.

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Hair Restoration Answers

What Causes Poor Hair Growth After Hair Transplant?

Q I had a hair transplant 15 months ago at a well known clinic in Manhattan. There were about 1000 grafts transplanted in the front hair line. At this point I am upset with my results. My guess is that only about 50 new hairs have grown. My question is what would cause this to happen? It seems to me that the hair transplant took longer than expected and my grafts died before they were placed! Please help! — B.E., Ithaca, N.Y.

A There are many factors that can contribute to poor growth during the hair restoration process including grafts that are left out of the holding solution too long or kept under the microscope for a prolonged period of time where they dry out.

Grafts can be injured in the dissection process or can be traumatized during the placing – if they are grasped too tightly or manipulated too much.

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Hair Restoration Answers

What is Graft Compression in a Hair Transplant?

Q: What exactly is compression in a hair transplant? — D.O., Short Hills, N.J.

A: Compression refers to the visible tufting of grafts due to the contraction of the grafts from the normal elasticity of skin around it, after it has been inserted into the recipient site.

Compression is most commonly seen when minigrafts are used in the hair restoration (minigrafts contain more than four hairs each).

Follicular units don’t show visible compression, since they are already naturally compact. However, if more than one follicular unit is placed into the same site, it can exhibit this phenomenon.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Have Hair Transplant and Use Hairpiece?

Q: What is your opinion on having a hair transplant to restore the hairline and then wearing a hair system behind it to regain the appearance of a full head of hair? K.Y. – Hackensack, New Jersey

A: It is my personal feeling that one should not use a hair transplant to supplement a hair system, especially at a young age. We have occasionally performed this procedure in older men and women.

In my view, a main purpose of a hair transplant is for it to be low maintenance. The combination of a hair transplant and a hairpiece is extremely fussy.

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Hair Restoration Research

Hair Curvature: An Important Factor for a Natural Looking Hairline

SUMMARY of Dr. Mohmand’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

The objective of this presentation is to share our experience and observations regarding the importance of the angle of curvature of the hair shaft during the hair transplant for producing a natural looking hairline.

Four important factors were kept in mind while performing the hair transplant regarding the natural looking hairline: 1) Avoidance of a straight line, 2) Keeping a transition zone between the bare forehead and the dense packing, 3) Density, 4) The acute angle of exit from the skin, 5) The angle of curvature of the hair shaft.

In our experience, since incorporating the angle of curvature of the hair shaft, the naturalness of the hairline has improved significantly. This is especially true for the frontal hair rows and the temporal peaks.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can Hair Loss Be Caused By Braids and Extensions?

Q: Over the years, I have worn my hair in braids and extensions. My hair is not growing at my hairline and temples. Can the braids be the cause and can this be treated with a hair transplant? — Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NYC

A: The name for hair loss is this area is called alopecia marginalis. It is almost invariably caused by continued traction from braids or hair extensions. When this is the case, the condition is also called traction alopecia. If the problem is long-standing, the hair will rarely come back, even if the braiding is stopped, and a hair transplant would be indicated.

If there is enough hair loss on the sides of the scalp that the donor supply is significantly reduced, surgical hair transplantation may not be possible.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can I Have an FUE Hair Transplant Using Beard Hair?

Q: Can you use beard hair for a hair transplant using Follicular Unit Extraction? — A.C., San Francisco, CA

A: It is possible to use beard hair for a hair transplant, but there are three main differences between harvesting from the donor area and harvesting from the beard that should be taken into account. These are: 1) scarring 2) ease of extraction and 3) hair quality. Let’s explore these differences in turn.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Consider Hair Transplant if I Have Early Hair Loss in Crown and Donor Area?

Q: I’m currently 24 years old. Ever since turning 20, my hair on top began to thin little by little. I have noticeable thinning on the top part of my scalp and on my crown, but have no recession at the temples. My hairline looks amazingly young and hair on the donor areas seems quite thick. Am I in the early stages of male patterned baldness? I cannot place myself in the Norwood scale since my thinning doesn’t seem to follow the classic pattern. I just started on Propecia. Should I be considering a hair transplant? — B.R., Landover, MD

A: From the description, it sounds like you have typical Diffuse Patterned Hair Loss or Diffuse Patterned Alopecia (DPA). In this condition, the top of the scalp thins evenly, the donor area remains stable, and the hairline is preserved for a considerable period of time. Please see: Classification of Hair Loss in Men for more information.

Propecia would be the best treatment at the outset. When the hair loss becomes more significant, patients with DPA are generally good candidates for surgical hair restoration. It is important, however, that your donor area is checked for miniaturization to be sure that it is stable before a hair transplant is considered.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

Hair Loss in Women the Topic in Dr. Bernstein ‘Early Show’ Interview

Excerpt from the interview:

Julie Chen: Dr. Bernstein, I want to go through all the options that are available for women, but what is the difference between female and male hair loss option-wise. What can we do to treat it?
Dr. Bernstein: The main difference medically is that women have hair loss often from hormonal changes and it’s due to an imbalance between progesterones and estrogens. That equilibrium can be reestablished with medication. Often birth control pills can do that.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

Dr. Bernstein Talks Hair Transplant Repair On ‘Good Morning America’

“Good Morning America” interviewed Dr. Bernstein in their two-part series on hair transplant surgery. Below is an excerpt from the interview:

Charles Gibson: Are there good candidates and bad candidates for this?
Dr. Bernstein: Yes. And actually people that wear hairpieces are sometimes tricky because their baseline is a full head of hair, so one of the important things that we had to discuss in the first consult was what his expectations were and whether he realized that a transplant wouldn’t give him the fullness of a hairpiece, but of course, it would look much more natural.

Watch the full interview.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

Follicular Hair Transplantation Makes Splash After Bernstein Introduces Procedure To American Academy of Dermatology

Cosmetic Surgery Times
Cosmetic Surgery Times - April 1997

Cosmetic Surgery Times features Dr. Bernstein’s presentation to the 55th annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in their April 1997 issue.

The article describes Dr. Bernstein’s introduction of the concept of Follicular Unit Transplantation to the academy as well as the keys to making the technique successful. From the article:

“‘Hair doesn’t grow singly it grows in naturally occurring groups of from one to four hairs. In follicular transplantation, we use these naturally occurring groups as the unit of the transplant,’ he told CST.

Although the procedure is highly labor intensive, it can actually be less expensive than conventional hair replacement surgery, because it can be performed in a single, but lengthy, session.

‘It is also much more efficient and conserves donor hair much better than conventional hair transplants. Every time you make an incision in the person’s scalp you waste some hair and make the remaining hair more difficult to remove. Accessing the donor area just once or twice will increase the total amount of hair that is available for the transplant,’ Dr. Bernstein told CST.”

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