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Showing results 1 - 10 of 573 for the search terms: shock loss.

Q: I had an FUE hair transplant three weeks ago and some of my existing non-transplanted hair has fallen out. I was a Norwood 3V, but now I look more like a 4 or 5 without the hair that used to help cover up my thinning area. Am I destined to look balder for the next few months? When can I expect to look like before? -- T.M., New Haven, CT A: You are describing shedding that is pretty typical following a hair transplant. The hair which is shed generally grows back together with the transplanted hair beginning at about three months. You should expect hair that is shaved for the FUE procedure to grow back right away at the normal rate of 1/2mm per day. The shedding (also called shock hair loss) doesn’t mean permanent damage to the hair follicles. What it refers to is a physiological, or normal, response to trauma to the scalp which is caused by the hair restoration procedure. In general, only miniaturized hair (the hair that is affected by androgens and that has begun to decrease in diameter) is shed after a transplant. This hair would be lost in the near term anyway. Existing…
Q: Will the shock of a hair transplant make me lose my existing healthy hair and is it permanent? – Westport, C.T. A: In general, only miniaturized hair (the hair that is affected by androgens and that has begun to decrease in diameter) is shed after a transplant. This hair would be lost in the near term anyway.
Q: What is "shock fall out"? – D.B., Chappaqua, N.Y. A: Shedding after a hair transplant is also referred to by the very ominous sounding term "shock fall out." The correct medical term is "effluvium" which literally means shedding. It is usually the miniaturized hair (i.e. the hair that is at the end of its lifespan due to genetic balding) that is most likely to be shed. Less likely, some healthy hair will be shed, but this should re-grow. Interestingly, if transplants are spaced less than one year apart, one often notices some shedding of the hair from the first transplant, but this hair grows back completely. For most patients, effluvium is not a major issue and should not be a cause for concern. Typically, when shedding occurs, a patient looks a little thinner during the several month period following the transplant, before the transplanted hair has started to grow. The thinning is often more noticeable to the patient than to others. Shedding is generally noted as a thinning, rather than of "masses of hair falling out," as the term "shock fall out" erroneously suggests. In general, the more miniaturization one has and the more rapid the hair loss, the…
Dr. Christine Shaver was recently interviewed by Allure magazine about the future of hair loss. In the published article, Dr. Shaver talked about why female hair loss can often be harder to treat than male hair loss. In men, the hormone DHT is the main culprit behind genetic hair loss. The main way to treat […]
Q: Why is hair loss in women harder to treat with hair transplants than hair loss in men? A: The majority of women present with diffuse hair loss (i.e. thinning all over) rather than the patterned hair loss seen in men (where the hair loss is localized to the front and top of the scalp). Diffuse thinning presents two problems for a potential hair transplant candidate. The first is that there is no permanent area where the hair can be taken from. If hair is taken from an area that is thinning, the transplanted hair will continue to thin after the procedure, since moving it doesn’t make it more permanent. The second problem is that since the areas to be transplanted are thin, rather than completely bald, the existing hair in the area of the hair transplant is at some risk to shedding as a result of the procedure. When women have a more defined pattern (i.e. more localized thinning on the front part of the scalp with a stable back and sides), they can make excellent candidates for surgery. This pattern occurs in about 20% of women. A small percentage of men have diffuse thinning and are, therefore, poor…

Showing results 1 - 10 of 573 for the search terms: shock loss.




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