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Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
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Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
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Hair Restoration Answers

After Hair Transplant, When Can I Resume Physical Training Or Exercise Regimen?

Q: When can patients resume physical training? — T.M., Mineola, N.Y.

A: Moderate exercise may be resumed two days after the hair transplant.

The main limitation is to avoid putting direct pressure on the donor area and to avoid stretching the back of the scalp (neck flexion) as this will increase the chance of stretching the donor scar after a strip procedure.

There is no such limitation with follicular unit extraction (FUE). However, in general, contact sports should be avoided for at least 10 days with FUE and a month after a strip procedure.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Hair Loss and Replacement for Dummies

Q: Why did you write another book on hair loss? — K.L., Greenville NY

A: Hair Loss and Replacement for Dummies is the first book that we have written that is specifically geared for the lay public. Besides hair restoration, it covers a wide range of topics including: the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions that can cause hair loss, tips on hair care, information on hair systems, and a number of other topics not stressed in our other books.

Our prior books, The Patient’s Guide to Hair Restoration and The Guide to Hair Restoration focused on medical treatments and surgical hair restoration. Although very easy to understand, they are most helpful for someone that already has a basic understanding of hair loss or that had a consultation.

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Bernstein Medical In The News

Podcast Transcript: Hair Loss & Replacement for Dummies

Announcer: PRWebPodcast.com, visiting with newsmakers and industry experts.

Interviewer: I am here today with Dr. Robert M. Bernstein, Clinical Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University and founder of Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration in New York. Dr. Bernstein is the co-author of the highly anticipated Hair Loss & Replacement for Dummies book. Welcome, Dr. Bernstein.

Dr. Bernstein: Good morning, thank you for having me.

Interviewer: Dr. Bernstein, why don’t you tell us a little bit about the book?

Dr. Bernstein: Sure. We wrote Hair Loss & Replacement for Dummies for anyone who wants to learn more about hair loss and its treatment. In the book, Dr. Rassman and I not only discuss common balding, but we cover a host of other conditions that can all lead to the loss of one’s hair. In the book, we give readers a basic understanding of hair and offer tips for taking better care of both the hair and scalp. Most importantly, the book describes the most up-to-date treatments for both male and female pattern hair loss.

Interviewer: This sounds interesting, why did you and Dr. Rassman decide to write the book?

Dr. Bernstein: Well, hair loss affects so many men and women. There is lots of information available on the web, but much of it is unreliable and the medical literature is often a bit too technical for the average reader. We wanted to provide a resource that was factual and comprehensive but, at the same time, very easy to understand. Hopefully, this book will allow those experiencing hair loss to be able to get straightforward, honest information and be able to make informed decisions if they require treatment.

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Hair Restoration Research

Strategies for Follicular Cell Implantation

Follicular cell implantation (FCI) is based on the ability of the dermal papilla (DP) cells, found at the bottom of hair follicles, to stimulate new hairs to form. DP cells can be grown and multiplied in culture, so that a very small number of cells can produce enough follicles to cover an entire bald scalp.

In order to produce new follicles, two types of cells must be present. The first are Keratinocytes, the major cell type in the hair follicle, and the second are dermal papillae cells (DP) which lie in the upper part of the dermis, just below the hair follicle. It appears that the DP cells can induce the overlying keratinocytes to form hair follicles. There are a number of proposed techniques for hair regeneration that use combinations of cells that are implanted in the skin. The two major techniques involve either transplanting dermal papillae cells by themselves into the skin, or implanting them with keratinocytes.

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Hair Restoration Research

New Methodology and Instrumentation for Follicular Unit Extraction

In this paper, Dr. James Harris presents a blunt tip instrument to be used in a 3-step FUE hair transplant procedure. The instrument is described as a 1-mm dissecting punch that has a tapered blunt edge. After scoring the skin with a sharp punch, the dissecting punch is advanced to a depth of approximately 4-mm.

This instrument is similar to the one recently described by Bernstein and Rassman in New Instrumentation for Three-Step Follicular Unit Extraction, recently published in Hair Transplant forum International New Instrumentation. Dr. Bernstein’s instrument was, in turn, based upon ideas presented in a paper written by Dr. Harris in 2004.

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Hair Restoration Research

Summary: Hope Grows For Bald Baby Boomers

An English based company called Intercytex has claimed some success in its research on hair cloning with its first testing in humans. This technique is similar to the one initially proposed by Dr. Colin Jahoda and published in 1999.

The idea is that certain cells (called fibroblasts) found at the bottom of hair follicles can be separated from the follicles after they have been removed from the scalp, and then be used to form new follicles.

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Hair Restoration Research

Instrumentation for Three-Step Follicular Unit Extraction

Robert M. Bernstein, M.D. Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York Abstract of Dr. Bernstein’s presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia Biography Robert M. Bernstein, M.D. is Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology at the College of Physicians […]

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Hair Restoration Research

Comparison of Different Instruments to Make Recipient Sites: Needles vs. Blades

SUMMARY of Dr. Perez-Meza’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

There have been great advances in hair restoration surgery over the past decade. New surgical techniques, instruments and medications have been developed to treat patients with hair loss. Some surgeons use needles to create the recipient sites and others use blades – both groups obtaining great results. There is some controversy, however, about the “ideal” instrument to make the recipient sites.

The objective of this study was to evaluate three different blades and three different needles used to make sites in the recipient area and to compare the wound healing and hair growth after the hair transplan

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Hair Restoration Research

Follicular Unit Growth at Four Different Hair Transplant Densities

SUMMARY of Dr. Beehner’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

There is a need to find the “threshold” density at which follicular unit (FU) graft recipient sites may be placed and yield excellent survival following a hair transplant. It also needs to be determined whether or not a smaller recipient site makes a difference in graft survival. This study looks at hair survival in two patients 18 months after they were each transplanted with four different densities.

The objective of the study was to determine the optimal density for “dense packing” FU grafts without causing loss of hair from vascular compromise or other factors that can affect graft growth during hair restoration surgery.

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Hair Restoration Research

Solution to Decrease Swelling after a Hair Transplant

SUMMARY of Dr. Abbasi’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

Edema of forehead and peri-orbital area is observed frequently after a hair transplant. To prevent this edema the authors introduced a new method (Abassi’s solution) at the 12th Scientific Meeting of ISHRS in Vancouver, Canada. The present study tries to determine if Abbasi’s solution can have a negative effect on the growth of transplanted grafts following hair restoration surgery.

In this study, the authors examined the effects of Abbasi’s solution on hair growth one year after a hair restoration procedure.

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Hair Restoration Research

Hair Curvature: An Important Factor for a Natural Looking Hairline

SUMMARY of Dr. Mohmand’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

The objective of this presentation is to share our experience and observations regarding the importance of the angle of curvature of the hair shaft during the hair transplant for producing a natural looking hairline.

Four important factors were kept in mind while performing the hair transplant regarding the natural looking hairline: 1) Avoidance of a straight line, 2) Keeping a transition zone between the bare forehead and the dense packing, 3) Density, 4) The acute angle of exit from the skin, 5) The angle of curvature of the hair shaft.

In our experience, since incorporating the angle of curvature of the hair shaft, the naturalness of the hairline has improved significantly. This is especially true for the frontal hair rows and the temporal peaks.

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Hair Restoration Research

Trichophytic Closure: A New Way to Camouflage a Hair Transplant Incision

Summary of “Trichophytic Closure of the Donor Area” which appeared in Hair Transplant Forum International July/August 2005 by Mario Marzola, MBBS Norwood Australia

When hair transplant surgeons meticulously close the edges of a donor wound, they generally end up with a fine, linear scar that is approximately 1-2mm in width. Sometimes, the scar can be a bit wider and every once in a while, when the person’s connective tissue is weak, or the edges of the scar are closed too roughly or have too much tension, the scar can be a cosmetic problem. The educated patient, who has expectations of a thin scar, or the patient who is likely to wear his hair very short, hopes that their hair transplant doctor can produce scars that are practically invisible.

A Trichophytic closure is a way of improving the linear donor scars of hair transplant patients. A Trichophytic incision in hair transplantation involves trimming off the upper edge of the incision and then closing the wound in such a way the hair near the edge can grow through the scar. This has the potential to produce a scar that is virtually undetectable.

To perform a comparison study, Dr. Marzola conducted a trial using 26 consecutive patients. Each hair transplant patient had one side of their scar closed trichophytically (i.e., with the top edge removed) and the other side closed with the edge left as is.

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Hair Restoration Research

Enhancement of Follicular Unit Extraction

SUMMARY of Dr. Harris’ Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

The SAFE System for FUE provided a novel methodology and new hair transplant instrumentation to increase graft production rates, decrease follicle transection rate, and expand patient candidacy for surgical hair restoration. However, the mechanism of the interaction of the blunt dissecting punch and the dermis produced follicular unit graft burial (approximately 7.2% of attempted extractions) that slowed the extraction process during the hair transplantation and resulted in inflammatory cysts requiring surgical excision in .02% of attempted graft extractions.

The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new dissecting tip that could potentially decrease the graft burial rate and increase the graft production rate in the hair restoration. In the study, three patients received a total of 422 grafts. The protocol utilized limited sharp dissection of the epidermis (using a 1-mm punch to a depth of approximately 1.3 mm) followed by the insertion of the specially modified dull dissecting tip to its full depth of 5 mm. The follicular units were then grasped with fine forceps and removed.

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Hair Restoration Research

A New Device for Efficient Strip Harvesting

SUMMARY of Dr. Haber’s Abstract from his presentation at the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, 2005 – Sidney, Australia

Harvesting high quality donor strips with minimal transaction remains an elusive goal for many hair transplant surgeons, particularly beginners. Hair restoration techniques that involve the use of scalpel blades demand the greatest skill and may cause significant transection. The Sandoval Score and Spread technique showed that non-traumatic dissection during hair transplantation is possible using a blunt instrument, but this technique is limited by poor ergonomics and the potential to cause tissue damage.

A new instrument for blunt dissection had been developed that is easy to use and is able to separate tissue along the natural planes of cleavage that causes minimal damage to hair follicles. This device has four sharp, staggered prongs aligned centrally and long handles developed for hair transplant procedures. This design utilizes the strong forearm muscles, as opposed to the weaker hand muscles, and distributes the spreading force over a larger area, minimizing trauma. A minimum depth scoring incision is made with a double-bladed scalpel to a depth of 1.5 mm. The device is inserted and expanded at intervals along the incision.

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Hair Restoration Research

An Idea Whose Time Has Come

by O’Tar T. Norwood, MD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
Hair Transplant Forum International (May/June 1997 issue)

I just returned from visiting Dr. Bob Bernstein in New York, and was impressed with his operation and even more impressed with his thoughts, observations, and insights into hair transplant surgery. He applies scientific methods to his work, is academically honest, and has an almost eerie instinctive knowledge of hair transplant surgery. Of course he has Dr. Bill Rassman to work with, but it is still remarkable. Dr. Bernstein is best known for introducing follicular transplantation to hair transplant surgery, an idea Bob Limmer has been pushing for ten years with the use of the binocular microscope, but no one would listen to him. Dr. Limmer, however, never used the term follicular transplantation. Using the microscope, you automatically dissect the follicular units. It can’t be avoided if done properly.

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