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Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
Flagship: 110 East 55th Street, New York, NY
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Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
Hair Restoration Answers

What is Lichen planopilaris?

Q: What is Lichen planopilaris? — G.S., Pleasantville, NY

A: Lichen planopilaris (LPP) is a distinct variant of cicatricial (scarring) alopecia, a group of uncommon disorders which destroy the hair follicles and replace them with scar tissue. LPP is considered to have an autoimmune cause. In this condition, the body’s immune system attacks the hair follicles causing scarring and permanent hair loss. Clinically, LPP is characterized by the increased spacing of full thickness terminal hairs (due to follicular destruction) with associated redness around the follicles, scaling and areas of scarred scalp. Read more ».

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can I Have a Hair Transplant to Cover a Single Bald Patch?

Q: I just started to lose my hair but it’s just in one spot, like a circle on the left side of my head. Do you ever do a hair transplant just into a bald spot and not the whole head? — D.F., Esher, U.K.

A: It is possible to have a hair restoration procedure into a single bald spot. However, it would be most beneficial to first determine the cause of the condition.

Bald spots caused by alopecia areata (an autoimmune disease) are best treated with injections of steroids into the scalp, rather than with a hair transplant. In fact, the transplanted hair can be rejected in patients with this condition.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can a Hair Transplant Correct Balding from Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE)?

Q: I have a bald patch on my scalp diagnosed as DLE, can this be corrected with a hair transplant? – V.Q., Scarsdale, N.Y.

A: DLE or discoid lupus erythematosus is a type of autoimmune disease where the body produces an inflammatory reaction to components of the skin, causing it to scar and lose hair.

The skin in the area of hair loss generally has a smooth appearance with tiny empty hair follicles, redness, and altered pigmentation. These skin changes help to differentiate it from the more common condition alopecia areata where the underlying skin appears normal.

The diagnosis of DLE can be confirmed by biopsy. Because DLE may exhibit a property called Koebnerization, where direct trauma can make the lesions enlarge, surgical hair restoration risks making the condition worse and is, therefore, not indicated.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can a Hair Transplant Repair the Bald Areas Caused by Alopecia Areata?

Q: Can a hair transplant into bald areas caused by alopecia areata ever be successful? — R.K., Providence, R.I.

A: Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own hair follicles. It generally appears as round patches of smooth bald areas scattered in the scalp or beard. Less commonly, it can involve the entire scalp (alopecia totalis) or all facial and body hair (alopecia universalis). Unless the condition is well localized and totally stable, hair transplantation is not likely to be effective because the transplanted hair would be subject to the same problem.

We prefer that one have no new lesions for a minimum of two years before considering surgical hair restoration, although this does not ensure that the procedure will be successful.

You may find more information on this relatively common condition at the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF). For more information, visit: www.naaf.org.

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