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Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
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Hair Restoration Answers

Do Propecia and Rogaine Act Synergistically?

June 19th, 2006

Q: I have read on numerous websites that Propecia and Minoxidil work synergistically, and that a hair loss suffer will see better results using them together than either one alone. Do you believe this is the case, or do you think Propecia is enough treatment by itself for someone who just began to experience slight hair thinning and is too early for hair transplantation? — K.V., Hewlett Bay Park, New York

A: They may act synergistically since their mechanisms of action are different.

Rogaine (Minoxidil) stimulates the hair follicle directly, but Propecia (Finasteride 1 mg) permits hair growth by blocking the negative effects of DHT. Of the two, Propecia is far more effective. It is reasonable to use the two together as long as the medications are used regularly.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Does the Donor Area Decrease in Size Over Time?

June 16th, 2006

Q: I am 22 and want to go for hair transplantation. I want hair restoration surgery now because I have a concern about my donor area that it might diminish if I postponed my transplantation. Could this be the case? — T.J., Westchester County, N.Y.

A: The logic is not correct. Having a hair transplant at an early age does not protect the donor supply.

If your donor area diminishes over time, then the transplanted grafts will fall out as well. Hair does not become permanent just because is moved in a hair transplant. It is never any better than the hair in the area where it came from.

The longer you wait – i.e. the older you are when a hair transplant is performed – the more information we will have about the stability of your donor area and this will allow for optimal planning of the hair restoration.

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Bernstein Medical News

Dr. Bernstein Makes “Best Doctors” in New York Magazine for Seventh Consecutive Year

June 14th, 2006

Best Doctors in NY - New York MagazineRobert M. Bernstein, MD has been selected as one of New York Magazine’s “Best Doctors” for the seventh year in a row.

This special annual issue in New York Magazine, June 13, 2006, presents the findings of Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., publishers of the guidebook, Top Doctors: New York Metro Area.

Dr. Bernstein is the only hair restoration surgeon honored to be included in this list of prominent physicians for seven consecutive years.

The physicians are chosen through a peer review process by Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd., publishers of the guidebook Top Doctors.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Increase Dose of Propecia if Hair Loss Continues During Treatment?

June 12th, 2006

Q: I recently turned 22 and have been on Propecia for about 2.5 years. The amount of hair that de-miniaturized with daily 1 mg peaked about a year ago and I have seen steady thinning since. I feel that I am too young for a hair transplant. My question is whether or not an increase in dosage of Propecia is indicated here or if I should seek other options entirely? — N.W., Portland, Oregon

A: At 22 years old, I would increase the dose of Propecia before considering hair restoration surgery. However, it is important to realize that there is no scientific evidence that increasing the dose will have any additional effects. There are published data by Roberts et al in the JAAD in 1999 demonstrating that 5 mg is no better than 1 mg from controlled clinical trials.

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Hair Restoration Answers

What is Tumescent Anesthesia and is it Used in a Hair Transplant Procedure?

May 31st, 2006

Q: I have read about something called “tumescent anesthesia” but didn’t understand what it is. What exactly is it? — S.S., Hoboken, N.J.

A: Tumescent techniques were first popularized in liposuction surgery where large quantities of fluid containing adrenalin were injected into the person’s fat layer to decrease bleeding before the fat was literally sucked out of the body. Bleeding was minimized because the epinephrine (adrenaline) constricted blood vessels and the fluid compressed the blood flow in the smallest blood vessels called capillaries.

The technique allowed small liposuction procedures to be performed safely as an out-patient procedure. In surgical hair restoration, low concentrations of anesthetic fluid and adrenaline are injected into the fat layer in the back of the scalp.

In a hair transplant, besides decreasing the bleeding, the fluid makes the skin more rigid so that the incision can be more easily made without cutting hair follicles. It also helps the doctor avoid damage to the deeper blood vessels and nerves in the scalp.

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Bernstein Medical News

Interview on Hair Loss and Hair Transplantation

May 17th, 2006

Part 1

Hair Loss in the Younger Person

Interviewer: I brought a fair number of questions related to aspects of androgenetic alopecia and hair transplantation, but I will also ask you some questions regarding two other types of hair loss, like alopecia areata and cicatricial alopecia. Most of our listeners are fairly educated about the different hair restoration options available to them, so I’ll tailor my questions primarily for this type of audience.

The first question that I want to direct here is the dilemma that many young people face when they’re losing their hair and are considering getting a hair transplant. They typically don’t know the degree to which their hair loss is going to progress. When you’re in your 20s and 30s, you want to have a decently low-running hairline and you want to have a crown that looks full. But given that you don’t know how far your hair loss is going to go, how would you address this scenario for people in that age range?

Dr. Bernstein: That is the main problem with treating younger people. We don’t really know how they’re going to progress. It is so important to wait, usually until the person is 23 to 25 before you can really get a sense of how much hair loss they are going to lose. And even at that age it’s sometimes very difficult to tell. That’s even after considering things such as family history.

A problem with treating a younger person with surgical hair restoration is that they often want things that are unrealistic. A person in their 20s is what we call “backward-looking.” They’re looking to when they were a teenager and they want their flat hairline back and all their old density. But hair transplants are forward-looking. We need to consider what they’re going to be like in ten or twenty years – not how they looked in the past.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Which Gives More Donor Hair: FUT or FUE Hair Transplant?

May 11th, 2006

Q: I am Norwood Class 6 and have read about both Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) and Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT). Which will give me more hair? — D.D., Highland Park, T.X.

A: In general, FUT will give you more hair since, in FUT, the best hair from the mid-portion of the permanent zone of the scalp (also called the “sweet spot”) can be utilized in the hair transplant.

With FUE, since only the hair follicles are extracted and not the surrounding bald skin, if too much hair is removed, the donor area will begin to look thin as hair is removed. This will limit the amount of hair that can be harvested.

Although in FUE additional areas of the scalp can be utilized to some degree, this will generally not compensate for the inability to access all of the hair in the mid-permanent zone and the total amount available for the hair restoration will be less.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Before Hair Transplant, How Long Should I Use Propecia?

April 14th, 2006

Q: I am 28 years old and was told that I have early Norwood Class 3 hair loss. I want to have a hair transplant but my doctor told me to use Propecia for 6 months and then come back to discuss surgery. I don’t want to wait that long, what should I do? — L.B., Oyster Bay Cove, NY

A: Actually, you should wait a full year.

If you are an Early Norwood Class 3, the Propecia can work so well (in actually growing hair back) that you may not even need a hair transplant.

The important point is that Propecia only starts working at 3-6 months and during this time there may actually be some shedding as the new growing hair literally pushes out the old.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Get a Hair Cut Before My Hair Transplant?

April 6th, 2006

Q: Should I cut my hair prior to the hair transplant? — R.R., Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

A: It is easier for the hair transplant surgeon and his team to work when the existing hair in the area to be transplanted is cut short, but a skilled surgeon can work well in either situation. Most experienced surgeons are used to working without cutting the hair in the recipient area, since so few patients want their hair to be cut – particularly in New York.

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Bernstein Medical News

Dr. Bernstein’s Lecture On FUT Hair Transplantation

March 27th, 2006

Dr. Bernstein's Lecture on FUT Hair Transplant SurgeryDr. Bernstein, a renowned teacher, lecturer, and surgeon, is bringing his state-of-the-art hair restoration techniques directly to patients. His lecture on Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) includes a historical review of hair transplant techniques, from the out-dated “hair plugs” and “cornrows” to refined FUT procedures. Watch the lecture to see images of surgical tools, illustrations of surgical techniques, and before and after patient photos.

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Updated: 2019-03-27 | Published: 2014-02-11


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