Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration - Rogaine Foam
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NYCityWoman.com

Dr. Bernstein was interviewed for an article in NYCityWoman.com that ran the gamut of available treatments for hair loss in women. Read below for some select quotes on a wide range of topics related to hair loss in women and treatments for female patients with androgenetic alopecia (common genetic hair loss).

On the fading stigma of hair loss in women:

“Women today are more comfortable talking about their hair loss.”

On indicators of hormone-driven female hair loss:

“It is typical to have a positive family history of hair loss and the presence of miniaturization (short, fine hairs) in the thinning areas.”

On minoxidil for regrowth of thinning hair:

Rogaine (minoxidil) can increase the quality (length and diameter) of hair that is just starting to thin.”

On the different strengths of Rogaine (minoxidil):

I generally recommend the 5 percent for women and men. Although it’s sold in separate packages for men and women, the basic ingredients are essentially the same.”

On Rogaine Foam:

“It is an elegant mixture, made for compliance,” says Dr. Bernstein. “It is an aerosolized foam, so it is less irritating than liquid Rogaine, but can be more difficult to get directly on the scalp.”

On LaserComb vs. cap-based Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) devices:

“The cap is both easier to use and more effective for very thin hair, due to the greater number of lasers. But for higher-density hair, a laser comb or the LaserBand82 may be more effective, as it’s probably better at getting the laser therapy beam to the scalp.”

On Follicular Unit Transplant (FUT) surgery:

FUT hair transplants allow many women to have a completely natural hair restoration, producing a dramatic change in their appearance.”

On Robotic FUE hair transplants:

Robotic FUE allows for unparalleled precision, without any line scars in the donor area and no post-operative limitations on physical activity.”

See before and after photos of some of our female hair transplant patients
Read about the causes, classification, diagnosis and treatment of hair loss in women

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Q: Do you think there is a difference in the efficacy between the 5% Rogaine foam or liquid formula? — N.N., Dallas, TX

A: In theory, the foam should be as effective as the original solution (liquid). However, an important part of the efficacy is getting the medication directly onto the scalp – rather than just on the hair.

For patients who are applying the medication to areas with a significant amount of hair, using the solution with a dropper applicator enables the medication to best reach the scalp. Because of this, I prefer that patients use the solution with a dropper applicator if they are using the medications in areas with a significant amount of hair. If patients find the solution irritating to the scalp (or too messy) and the foam less so, then using the foam is better than nothing.

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Q: I recently had a hair transplant about a month ago. Currently I’m on Propecia and I am a stickler to taking it at the same time every day. I don’t, however, use Rogaine namely because I fear the irritation it can possibly cause will halt graft growth and because I’ve heard that the grafts and post-surgical shock loss hair will return without its use. Is it ok to use only Propecia post-surgically? Or would adding Rogaine be of any significant benefit? — L.B., Rye, NY

A: I would definitely stay on Propecia (finasteride) and, if you like, you can add Rogaine (minoxidil) – it may have a little additional benefit. The 5% foam formulation is less irritating and can be started a week after the hair transplant.

The only problem with Rogaine is compliance. If you think that you will use it long-term, it is worth using. If, however, you think that you will get tired of it and stop, then it is not worth starting.

Any shedding with either medication is temporary and usually indicates that the drug is working.

Read about Rogaine (minoxidil)
Read about Propecia (finasteride)

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Q: Our dermatologist originally suggested our son use the 5% Rogaine and he developed an allergic reaction to it. Allergy tests confirmed it was the propylene glycol causing the reaction. I understand that Rogaine foam has 5% minoxidil in it but no propylene glycol. Is that correct? — B.M., Lower East Side, N.Y.

A: In addition to minoxidil 5%, Rogaine Foam contains: butane, butylated hydroxytoluene, cetyl alcohol, citric acid, fragrance, glycerin, isobutane, lactic acid, polysorbate 60, propane, purified water, SD alcohol 40-B, stearyl alcohol — but no propylene glycol.

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