Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
Flagship: 110 East 55th Street, New York, NY
Add'l Loc: 229 7th Street, Garden City, NY
Call Us: 212-826-2400
Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
Hair Restoration Answers

In Hair Transplant Repair, What is Hair Follicle Survival Rate for Re-implanted Grafts?

Q: When you remove hair plugs and re-use the hair from the grafts, what is the survival rate for those follicular units? — W.B. ~ Upper West Side, N.Y.

A: The survival rate is close to that when grafts harvested via FUT or FUE. However, if the grafts are placed into a significantly scarred scalp, this can have a negative impact on growth.

Read more about Hair Plug Removal

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can I Have a Hair Transplant if I Have a Scar in My Donor Area? If So, Which Do You Recommend, FUT or FUE?

Q: I have a diagonal scar in the middle of my donor area that I got during a childhood accident and I am concerned that it will limit my options for hair restoration. Will this type of scar prevent me from having either FUT or FUE? Do you recommend one or the other? — R.F., Upper West Side, NY

A: Traumatic scars in the donor area do not preclude us from performing a hair transplant. With an FUT/strip procedure, we can remove all or part of the scar when we excise the donor strip. In Robotic FUE, the ARTAS Robot can be programmed to avoid a scar during harvesting. In either procedure, we can improve the appearance of the scar by implanting follicular unit grafts directly into the scar tissue. The hairs will grow permanently in the scar, just like ones we implant in the recipient area, and the scar will become harder to detect.

It is important to note that transplanted hair will not grow in a thickened scar. If your scar is thickened, the doctor can thin it out (soften it) with injections of cortisone. They are usually repeated at 4-6 week intervals in advance of the procedure. The number of injection sessions required depends upon the thickness of the scar and your individual response to the medication.

The presence of a traumatic scar should generally not determine which type of transplant you have. That should be decided in consultation with your physician based on factors such as how much volume you need, how you intend to style your hair, how short you would like to keep it, how soon you need to return to strenuous physical activity, and other general considerations for a hair transplant.

We recently posted photos from a patient who had a robotic hair transplant with a scar in his donor area. The photos include images of his donor area (with scar) before his procedure, immediately after robotic graft harvesting and 11 days post-op. View this patient’s before after photos.

Video: How Does the ARTAS Robotic Hair Transplant System Locate and Dissect Follicular Units?

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Hair Restoration Answers

What Causes Poor Hair Transplant Growth?

Q: Do you ever see poor growth from a hair transplant? — R.L., Edison, NJ

A: The situations where I have encountered poor growth are:

1) When hair is transplanted to areas of skin that has been thickened due to the prior placement of larger grafts or plugs (this is called “hyperfibrotic thickening”). Removal of the larger grafts can somewhat ameliorate this problem.

2) When hair is transplanted into a thickened scar.

3) When a hair transplant is performed into an area of severe chronic sun damage. In this case, a very modest number of grafts should be used in the first session and if these grow well, additional grafts can be added in a subsequent session.

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