Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
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Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
Bernstein Medical In The News

Dr. Bernstein Interviewed by NY Japion Magazine on the Latest in Hair Transplant Surgery

Dr. Bernstein Interviewed in NY Japion Pt 2Dr. Bernstein was featured in a wide-ranging interview published in the New York City-based, Japanese language magazine NY Japion. Among the topics discussed were the differences between FUT and FUE hair transplants, updates on robotic hair transplant technology, the type of procedure most beneficial for Asian patients, criteria that determine candidacy for a hair transplant, and more.

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Hair Restoration Research

Study is the First to Measure Perceived Benefits of Hair Transplant Surgery

A recently published study is the first to measure the perceived benefit of hair transplantation on a patient’s age, attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability – key factors that play an important role in workplace and social success. The pilot study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Facial Plastic Surgery, found that hair transplant recipients were perceived by others to be 3.6 years younger following their hair restoration surgery. The data indicate that the person’s attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability also showed statistically significant positive changes as a result of hair restoration surgery.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can A Hair Transplant Damage Existing Hair Follicles In A Thinning Area?

Q: My hair is thinning, but I’ve been told I have too much existing hair to warrant a hair transplant. I heard that transplanting new hair into my thinned areas will lead to a loss of existing hair follicles. I was told to delay a hair transplant procedure until my density has further decreased. Is this true? — M.S., Maple Glen, P.A.

A: It is possible that you simply don’t need a hair transplant at this time one. If you have early thinning, it may be best treated with medication, or not at all. As you age, we will have a better idea of your thinning pattern and, at that time, a hair transplant may be more appropriate.

A hair transplant does not cause loss of hair follicles in the recipient area. The procedure may cause a temporary “shock” loss of the hair. Shock hair loss is a physiologic response to the trauma to the scalp which is caused by a hair transplant. Hair that is healthy is going to come back after some period of time – generally 6 months. Hair that may be near the end of its lifespan may not return. When a hair transplant is performed at the proper time, in the proper candidate, shock hair loss should just be an incidental issue.

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Hair Restoration Answers

When To Assess One’s Donor Supply?

Q: I am 24 years old and just starting to thin. I was told by another doctor that it was too early to have a hair transplant, but the hair on the back and sides of my scalp seems really thick. Shouldn’t I have a hair transplant now, just in case I am not a candidate in the future? — A.S., Cherry Hill, NJ

A: The most important criteria in determining who will be a candidate for a hair transplant is the presence of sufficient permanent donor hair. When hair loss is early, it is often hard for the doctor to determine this, since early on the donor area can appear very stable. It is not until the front and/or top of the scalp has significant thinning that the donor area may also show thinning. Therefore, it is only at this time that the stability of the donor area can adequately be assessed.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Which is the Preferred Treatment for a Young Patient: Hair Transplant or Medication?

Q: I am 25 year old who just started going bald. My doctor confirmed that I have pattern baldness and put me on Propecia and Rogaine. I don’t want to go bald at any age. So, instead of prolonging the process for 5-10 years and then having a HT, isn’t it easier to let the hair loss continue and then have a HT, so, that I can save the money on drugs for years. — Z.B., Greenwich, C.T.

A: It is far better to keep your own hair. Keeping your own hair will generally look fuller than a hair transplant, since a hair transplant just re-distributes existing hair (until hair cloning techniques are available).

The medications (i.e. finasteride and minoxidil) are relatively cheap if you get the generic forms.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can a Hair Transplant Treat Hair Loss that begins in the Early 20s?

Q: I am in my early 20’s and I was told my hair loss pattern is a Norwood Class 6, on its way to becoming a Class 7. My hair is brown in color and medium to coarse and I was told I have high density in my donor area. Although I was told I could have hair transplants, do you think that I should based upon what I have told you? — D.W., Pleasantville, N.Y.

A: The main concern I would have is that when someone is already a Class 6 by their early 20’s, he may eventually be left with only a very thin see-through fringe as he ages. A high donor density now does not ensure that this will not occur – and coarse hair at 22 does not ensure that it will not become fine over time.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Can Hair Transplant Restore Hairline in 21 Year Old With Early Hair Loss?

Q: Hi, I am a 21 year old male experiencing the first signs of hair loss as of late. I looked at your before and after pictures of hair transplant patients and honestly right now I have a lot more hair than the patients, even in the after photos. By no means do I intend to criticize your work at all, but I noticed that they still had a receding hairline. I myself am an artist and pay close attention to detail. What I want out of a hair transplantation procedure is to basically have the full head of hair that I had even before puberty. Is it possible for this to be done?

A: Your concerns and goals, although understandable, are impossible to achieve through hair transplantation and is exactly the reason why we don’t perform hair transplants in young persons.

Surgical hair restoration can never give you your original density back since we are just redistributing a smaller amount of hair.

In addition, your original hairline should not be restored since a transplanted hairline is permanent and will not evolve naturally as you age. A mature hairline must be built into the design of the first hair restoration procedure, regardless of a patient’s age.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Is Success of Hair Transplant Affected by Age or Scalp Fibrosis?

Q: It is my understanding that as a person loses his or her hair, the skin of the scalp undergoes a number of changes, namely there is a loss of fat, an increase in cellular atrophy, and of course the dreaded perifollicular fibrosis (now that’s a mouthful). It seems to me that these changes, in particular the fibrotic scarring, are the main obstacles in the way of regrowth, and the reason Propecia does not work for extensively bald men. What can be done about this demon we call fibrosis? Can it be slowed, stopped, prevented, reversed? If we could somehow counteract collagen formation, wouldn’t our baldness problems be solved for good? If a bald scalp is atrophic, how does it have the capacity to hold a whole new head of transplanted hair? Is there a limitation to the number of hairs we can transplant (outside of donor limitations)? — R.L., Rivington, C.T.

A: The findings that you are describing are well documented; however, it is not clear if these changes are the cause of the hair loss or are the result of having lost one’s hair. Most likely, the DHT causes the hair follicles to miniaturize and eventually disappear. This, in turn, causes the scalp to thin and lose its abundant blood supply (whose purpose is to nourish the follicles). The changes in the scalp are also affected by normal aging, which causes alterations in connective tissue including the breakdown of collagen and other components of the skin. The changes seen with aging are greatly accelerated by chronic sun exposure.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Am I Too Old for Hair Transplant Surgery?

Q: Is there ever an age where you are too old for a hair transplant? — L.K., Norwalk, C.T.

A: One can be too young for surgical hair restoration, but not too old (as long as one is in good health medically).

Older people generally make excellent candidates for hair transplantation since their expectations are generally more realistic and the future extent of their hair loss more predictable than in those who are younger.

We have successfully treated a number of people in their 80s. In spite of the fact that their spouses and friends asked them, “What do you need a hair transplant for at your age,” the patients were uniformly happy that they did the surgery.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Does the Donor Area Decrease in Size Over Time?

Q: I am 22 and want to go for hair transplantation. I want hair restoration surgery now because I have a concern about my donor area that it might diminish if I postponed my transplantation. Could this be the case? — T.J., Westchester County, N.Y.

A: The logic is not correct. Having a hair transplant at an early age does not protect the donor supply.

If your donor area diminishes over time, then the transplanted grafts will fall out as well. Hair does not become permanent just because is moved in a hair transplant. It is never any better than the hair in the area where it came from.

The longer you wait – i.e. the older you are when a hair transplant is performed – the more information we will have about the stability of your donor area and this will allow for optimal planning of the hair restoration.

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Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Have Hair Transplant and Use Hairpiece?

Q: What is your opinion on having a hair transplant to restore the hairline and then wearing a hair system behind it to regain the appearance of a full head of hair? K.Y. – Hackensack, New Jersey

A: It is my personal feeling that one should not use a hair transplant to supplement a hair system, especially at a young age. We have occasionally performed this procedure in older men and women.

In my view, a main purpose of a hair transplant is for it to be low maintenance. The combination of a hair transplant and a hairpiece is extremely fussy.

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