Robotic Hair Transplants & Hair Restoration
110 East 55th Street, New York, NY
Contact Us: 212-826-2400
Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration
Hair Restoration Research

JAK Inhibitors Prove Effective in Trials on Alopecia Areata

Two new studies researching a class of drugs called JAK inhibitors have shown that oral treatment results in significant hair regrowth in patients with alopecia areata, an autoimmune condition that causes non-scarring patches of localized hair loss. Currently there is no cure for alopecia areata, so the possibility of a safe, effective medication is welcome news for thousands of affected patients. The two studies were published in September 2016 in the journal JCI Insight, a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to biomedical research.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Do Propecia (Finasteride) and Rogaine (Minoxidil) Work on Front of the Scalp?

Q: Both Propecia and Minoxidil definitely can work in the front of the scalp as long as there is some hair in the area. Although their mechanisms of action are different, both Propecia (finasteride) and Rogaine (minoxidil) act to thicken miniaturized hair regardless of where it is on the scalp. In fact, there are published data (Leyden et. al., JAAD, 1999) demonstrating this improvement in a controlled clinical trial of men with frontal hair loss. — J.S., Great Falls, Virginia

A: Both Propecia and Minoxidil definitely can work in the front of the scalp as long as there is some hair in the area. Although their mechanisms of action are different, both Propecia (finasteride) and Rogaine (minoxidil) act to thicken miniaturized hair regardless of where it is on the scalp. In fact, there are published data (Leyden et. al., JAAD, 1999) demonstrating this improvement with finasteride in a controlled clinical trial of men with frontal hair loss.

The source of the confusion on this topic is the fact that the FDA limited the application of the drugs to the crown on the package inserts for both Propecia and Rogaine. The FDA did this because Upjohn (the company that introduced Rogaine) and Merck (Propecia) only tested the medications on the crown in the clinical trials. Logically, the fact that DHT causes frontal hair loss and Propecia works by blocking DHT gives a reasonable explanation for the efficacy of the drug on the front of the scalp. Also, a side effect of the use of minoxidil is facial hair, so how could it not also work on the front of the scalp? It is regrettable that some doctors and many patients think that these medications won’t work on the front of the scalp. Unfortunately, many hair restoration surgeons have done little to educate the public and dispel this myth.

To reiterate, yes, both of these medications can work on the front of the scalp to prevent hair loss and thicken a thinning hairline. However, it is important to note that neither of these medications can grow hair on a totally bald scalp or lower an existing hairline. Hair follicles must exist for the medications to work. It is also important to stress that the best results come from using both finasteride and minoxidil together.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Does Propecia Cause Infertility?

Q: I’ve heard that FDA added a description of reports of male infertility to the side effect labels of both Propecia and Proscar (finasteride). Is this a likely side effect in your experience? — S.S., Rolling Hills, California

A: Propecia (finasteride 1mg) may, uncommonly, lead to male infertility by changing the consistency of the male ejaculate as well as decreasing the sperm count.

Ejaculate is a combination of sperm produced by the testes and a viscous fluid made by the prostate. Since finasteride shrinks the prostate it make the ejaculate less viscous (more watery).

Most patients taking Propecia and trying to conceive have no issues.

If one is trying to conceive for 4-6 months and having difficulty, then it is reasonable to stop taking Propecia.

It is important to know that taking Propecia while trying to conceive will not lead to congenital deformities or issues with the fetus as long as the women does not come in direct contact with the medication.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

What is Latest Information on Persistent Side Effects from Finasteride?

Q: I have heard that side effects from finasteride can persist even after stopping the medication. What is the most current information on this issue? — S.V., Short Hills, N.J.

A: For the past two years I have been on the ISHRS’s Task Force on Finasteride Adverse Events and struggling to make sense of this issue. There seems to be a disconnect between the relatively low incidence of side effects that we, as physicians, see in our practices, what published controlled studies have shown, and what is now being reported on the internet. For example, a 2012 study by Sato of 3,177 Japanese men published the Journal of Dermatology, showed a 0.7% incidence of adverse reactions to finasteride 1% and no persistent side effects after stopping the medication.

That said, there has been a recent increase in anecdotal reports of side effects from finasteride as well as reports of persistent side effects after the medication has been discontinued (referred to as “Post-finasteride Syndrome”).

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Are Reports of Persistent Side Effects With Finasteride Real?

Q: Dr. Bernstein, I am an attending at Mass General Hospital in Boston and would like to ask you regarding your experiences using finasteride for male androgenetic alopecia. While I have not noticed any side effects in the patients that I have been treating, I increasingly get questions regarding side effects based on the recent media attention to reports of potentially permanent problems regarding libido or erectile dysfunction. I know that in the literature there is a slight increase of reversible sexual dysfunction (~4% vs. ~2% in placebo) with Propecia, and no convincing evidence to date in the medical literature that have used controlled studies regarding permanent problems even after discontinuing Propecia. — S.Z., Boston, Massachusetts

A: That is correct.

Q: I know that you have treated many patients over a long period of time, and I was thus wondering what your take is on potentially permanent sexual dysfunction after taking finasteride. Have you seen any convincing reports/patients or do you have any concerns regarding irreversible side effects?

A: I have seen 5 cases in over 10,000 patients on finasteride that complained of this but, of course, there is no way to know for sure if there is a cause and effect relationship. As you know, real side effects may be followed by psychological ones and if the sexual dysfunction has another cause, then stopping finasteride would have no effect on the symptoms. The incidence of sexual dysfunction in the population of men on finasteride is about 30%, so one would expect these numbers to be much higher just due to the normal incidence. It is really a difficult situation to understand. The experience that my colleagues and I have in our practices is much different than one would expect after reading the numerous anecdotal reports on the internet.

Q: Would you think it is safe to say that any potential sexual dysfunction is reversible after discontinuing the use of finasteride?

A: I don’t think that anyone knows at this point. The FDA is coming down on the side of caution and saying that it is possible, although it is not based on any new studies. If the phenomenon is real, the possible mechanism is not yet known.

Q: In the relatively few patients that I have treated with Propecia, they did not even report temporary problems regarding libido or erectile dysfunction. Do you think they are real or rather attributed to Propecia simply because the patient is made aware of these potential side effects?

A: I think that psychological effects may account for many cases. At this time, it is still not clear if a physiologic “post-finasteride syndrome” is real. A lot more work needs to be done before we have a definitive answer to this question.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Should I Start Hair Loss Treatment With Finasteride or Dutasteride?

Q: I recently visited my dermatologist regarding my hair loss, and after checking my hair he said I am showing signs of [Androgenetic Alopecia (AGA)], and said if I don’t treat it, it will progress. From my research on the net, I figured he will put me on Propecia. In fact he put me on Avodart. When I told him it is not FDA-approved for hair loss, and Propecia is, he said Avodart is better and brings DHT down more, and Propecia is nothing next to Avodart. He told me to take it every day for 2 weeks, then every other day from then on as it has a long half life. From researching on the net, many hair restoration doctors, rarely prescribe Avodart for hair loss due to some dangers. What is your opinion on this? — T.G., Darien, Connecticut

A: Although dutasteride (Avodart) can be more effective for male pattern hair loss, I would start with finasteride (Propecia) as many patients do great with it and the safety profile is better. The following are things I would consider before starting dutasteride:

  1. As you point out, dutasteride is not FDA-approved for hair loss.
  2. There is no data on its safety when used for hair loss. This is important since dutasteride has been only tested on an older population of patients (with prostate disease) rather than a younger population of patients needing medical treatment for androgenetic alopecia.
  3. These is no natural model for dutasteride’s combined blockage of both type 1 and 2 5-alpha reductase (finasteride blocks only type 2 5-AR and there are families that have this deficiency and have no long-term problems. This, by the way, is how the drug was discovered).
  4. The type 1 enzyme which dutasteride blocks is present in many more tissues of the body (including the brain) compared to type 2 (which is more localized to the skin).
  5. Although so far unproven, there is a concern that finasteride may produce side effects than can be persistent after stopping the medication (post-finasteride syndrome). It this does turn out to be true, the effects from dutasteride would most likely be significantly more persistent.
  6. If you start with finasteride and do have side effects, you will most surely have side effects from dutasteride; therefore, by taking finasteride first you will have avoided the potentially more problematic side effects from dutasteride
  7. You may respond well to finasteride, and so do not need to consider dutasteride
Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Using Avodart If Propecia Does Not Work

Q: I am 27 years old and I have been on Propecia for 12 months now. Honestly, I have seen no response from it. In my dermatologist’s opinion I am a non-responder. I asked about Avodart and he said, since Propecia didn’t help then Avodart won’t help as well since both are DHT blockers, and if one didn’t work the other won’t either. In your opinion do you think Avodart is better? I have read that it blocks more DHT than Propecia. What is the dosing for Avodart? If someone does not respond to Propecia will they also not respond to Avodart? — A.C., West University Place, Texas

A: Avodart (dutasteride) is more effective than Propecia (finasteride) and some patients will respond to dutasteride who do not respond to finasteride. Dutasteride decreases serum DHT about 90% compared to 70% for finasteride. The usual starting dose of Avodart is 0.5mg a day. That said, it is not FDA approved for use in hair loss and if a person has sexual side effects, the side effects are more likely to be persistent after stopping the medication compared to finasteride.

Posted by Updated
Bernstein Medical In The News

Drs. Schweiger and Bernstein Publish First Case Study Of Latisse For Eyebrow Restoration

Journal of Drugs in DermatologyThe January 2012 issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology contains an article, written by Drs. Schweiger and Bernstein, which is the first case study of eyebrow growth from the topical use of bimatoprost.

Latisse (bimatoprost) is a topical medication that is FDA-approved for eyelash growth. Some physicians have used the medication for “off-label” use, such as use with eyelashes and scalp hair. However, until recently, there had not been any published medical literature describing the off-label use.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Which Handheld Laser Therapy Device Do You Recommend?

Q: I am interested in trying home laser therapy for my androgenic alopecia? Which handheld laser device do you recommend? — N.M., Northfield, NJ

A: There are several handheld lasers currently marketed as a home use treatments for androgenic alopecia. To my knowledge there has never been a clinical study comparing different laser devices. Most of the devices use diodes to emit a narrow band red light. This wavelength of light is actually similar to those that are used in hair removal lasers, except they are at a much lower intensity. The theory is that high intensity laser damage hair follicles causing hair loss, but low level laser energy can have a bio-stimulation effect and actually induce hair growth.

If you would like to try laser therapy for hair loss, I suggest using a HairMax laser comb. This is the only device that is FDA approved. They sell a few different “strengths” of lasers for different costs. They have not shown any clinical evidence supporting one laser comb versus another. The more expensive ones have more diode lights so it would be reasonable to conclude that they are “stronger” and require less frequent use. I have patients who have used the “mid tier” laser comb, the Premium Lux 9 successfully, so that is the one I recommend to other patients.

Posted by Updated
Bernstein Medical In The News

Restoration Robotics Receives FDA Approval for FUE Hair Transplantation

Restoration Robotics, Inc. — based in Mountain View, CA — has developed a robotic system for follicular unit extraction (FUE), called the ARTAS robotic system for hair restoration. The computerized device has received 510(k) approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Restoration Robotics is due to begin marketing the system for use in hair restoration clinics in the United States.

The FDA classifies the ARTAS robotic system for hair restoration as a “computer assisted hair harvesting system” and describes it as being used to identify and extract follicular units to aid the surgeon during hair transplant procedures.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

When Was the ARTAS Robotic System Approved For FUE Hair Transplants?

Q: When was ARTAS robot for FUE approved for use in hair transplantation? — J.B., Jersey City, NJ

A: Restoration Robotics’ ARTAS System for robotic follicular unit harvesting, received 510K clearance by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on April 14, 2011. The indication is for “harvesting hair follicles from the scalp in men diagnosed with androgenetic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) with black or brown straight hair.”

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

What is the Latest in Hair Transplant Robotics?

Q: I have read your page on robotics in hair restoration and am interested in learning more. Are there any updates in the development of the system you mentioned? — W.T., London, UK

A: Restoration Robotics, Inc. — based in Mountain View, CA — has spent the last few years developing and testing a robotic hair transplant device for follicular unit extraction (FUE). The ARTAS robot system has recently received 510(k) approval from the Food and Drug Administration, meaning that the company may now begin marketing the system for use in hair restoration clinics.

Posted by Updated
Bernstein Medical In The News

Dr. Schweiger Discusses LaserComb for Hair Loss in Women in Wall Street Journal

Wall Street JournalDr. Eric S. Schweiger, an Associate at Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration, was interviewed recently for an article in the Wall Street Journal.

The article — Can Lasers Stimulate a Hair-Growth Spurt? — discusses the efficacy of the HairMax LaserComb and low level laser therapy (LLLT) and also touches on Dr. Schweiger’s main area of expertise, the diagnosis and treatment of hair loss in women.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

After a Hair Transplant Can I Replace Hair Loss Medication with Laser Therapy or Herbs?

Q: I am interested in a hair transplant, but am turned off by the apparent side effects of follow up Propecia. Could herbs serve the purpose of Propecia? Regarding laser treatments, do they work on their own, or do you need drugs to supplement? Can laser damage in some cases, rather than benefit? It seems odd that laser therapy has been undertaken in Europe for 10 years, yet there are no published studies on the results. Might this be because it doesn’t work in the longer term? — D.D., Richmond, U.K.

A: Finasteride is the best medication. Herbs are not particularly effective for hair loss. You should consider trying finasteride.

If you are in the 2% group that has side effects with Propecia, just stop taking the medication. If you do not experience side effects, then there is no problem taking the medication long-term. Hair transplant surgery doesn’t prevent the progression of hair loss. That is why it is used in conjunction with medication.

Click here to read the rest of the post.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Which Laser Comb Works Best to Regrow Hair?

Q: I have been trying to find some evaluation of which laser combs work best for “hair restoration”. I have seen some dermatologists speak about the Hair Max laser comb and its effectiveness (considering patient compliance, the amount of time the patient has been losing hair, the amount of total hair loss at time of treatment, etc.). I have also seen reference to the Sunetic laser comb which claims to have a superior technology to the Hair Max and offers a changeable head to allow treatment of the skin for healing, wrinkles, etc. A company in Michigan also offers a laser comb called the Hair Rejuvenator which it claims is superior to either of the other combs but I have not heard of any dermatologist who recommends this comb. A firm in Australia also offers a laser comb (Aculas) which it claims is the most effective; however, the makers of the Hair Rejuvenator comb say it is too powerful and dangerous and could cause blindness. Amidst all these claims, the consumer (patient) is left wondering which best option is and which is merely hype or fraud. What do you suggest?

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Does Rogaine Only Work on Crown?

Q: I heard that Rogaine only works on the crown and not on the front or top of the scalp. Is this true? — D.D., New Haven, Connecticut

A: Rogaine (Minoxidil) has the potential to work where ever there is miniaturized hair, either the front, top or crown (however, it will not work in areas that are completely devoid of hair).

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Laser Therapy: What is Revage Laser and How Does it Compare to Laser Comb?

Q: I heard that you could get a laser treatment for hair loss in a doctor’s office with a new laser called the Revage. What is this and how does it compare to the laser comb that I can buy myself?

A: The Revage Laser is a Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) treatment for thinning hair manufactured by the company Laser Hair Therapy of North America, LLC. It is FDA classified or permitted to be sold as a cosmetic device, but not as a medical device at this time.

The Revage system contains 30 laser diodes that rotate 180 degrees around the scalp. This dynamic process increases the contact of the laser energy with the hair follicles. It is available only through a physician’s office.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Do You Recommend Finpecia or Generic Finasteride?

Q: I am 26 years old and in the beginning of losing my hair and not ready for hair transplant surgery. It seems to have stopped now but 4 months ago I shed a lot of hair and can visually see that my hair on the scalp is thinning out. I have looked into and read up on taking Propecia or more exactly Finpecia (I’m a student so cost is a factor), but can I trust this generic drug? Have looked at the company (Cipla) website but I’m still a bit scared of taking something I don’t really know what it is. What is your opinion on choosing Finpecia over Propecia? — E.E., Midtown East, N.Y.

A: Finpecia is manufactured in India by a slightly different method than the way Propecia is produced in the U.S. Since finasteride 5mg is now available in a generic from in the U.S., I suggest that you use finasteride 5mg and quarter the 5mg tablet with a pill cutter and take 1/4 tablet a day. The parts do not need to be the same size. In the U.S., generic finasteride and Propecia (1mg) and Proscar (5mg) are all made the same way. Cipla is a large company, but is not under U.S. FDA supervision.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Do You Recommend Loniten as Hair Loss Medication?

Q: Is Loniten good for treating hair loss? — N.V., East Hills, N.Y.

A: Loniten (oral minoxidil) is not useful for treating hair loss. The reason is that it stimulates hair growth all over the body (hypertrichosis) and has a number of serious side effects.

Even when used to treat blood pressure, for which it is FDA approved, it is a medication reserved only for severe hypertension, used after at least three other types of blood pressure medications have been tried and are unsuccessful.

In addition to increased body and facial hair growth, it can cause fluid retention and heart disease. When used topically (topical generic minoxidil or Rogaine) the medication generally does not cause any significant problems other than local skin irritation and occasionally increased facial hair (which can be real nuisance for women).

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Do You Recommend Avolve Hair Loss Medication?

Q: My friend just came back from Paris and said that his cousin was taking Avolve for hair loss. Can you tell me what that is and is it available in the U.S.? — N.W., Portland, Oregon

A: Avolve is the European trade name for dutasteride 0.5mg made by GlaxoSmithKline for prostate enlargement. In the U.S. dutasteride 0.5mg, under the brand name Avodart, is FDA approved to treat prostate enlargement (BPH). It has not been FDA approved for hair loss.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

What are Obstacles to Hair Cloning Techniques?

A: The main problem is that the cultured cells may lose their phenotype with multiple passages, i.e. lose their ability to differentiate into hair follicles after they have been multiplied.

Another problem of hair cloning is that the orientation of hair direction must be controlled. With mouse experiments, the hairs grow at all different directions. Scientists need to find a way to align the hair so that it grows in the right direction. Hair, of course, must also be of a quality that is cosmetically acceptable and matches the patient existing hair. And the hair should grow in follicular units. Individual hairs will not give the fullness or natural look of follicular units.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Is Finpecia a Viable Hair Loss Medication?

Q: A friend of mine is taking Finpecia, is this the same as Propecia? — A.B., St. Louis, Missouri

A: Both Propecia and Finpecia contain the active ingredient Finasteride 1mg. Finpecia is manufactured in India by the company Cipla. It comes in packets of 10. Finpecia contains the same chemical ingredient as Propecia, i.e. 1mg of Finasteride, but it is manufactured differently and it is less expensive.

Indian patent law allows companies in India to make medications that are patented by drug companies in other countries, since Indian law protects only the processes by which drugs are made and not medication itself. Therefore, if an Indian company finds another way to make a drug, it can legally do so.

Cipla has not published any studies showing that their generic Finasteride is identical or as effective as Merck’s original product in treating hair loss. These alternative processes and drugs are not regulated by the FDA, so there is no assurance that the medication manufactured in India has the same biologic activity or potency as the FDA approved counterpart made in the United States.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Is Hair Loss Treatment with Avodart Safe?

Q: My friend is taking Avodart, he bought it over the internet. Is it safe to take? — T.G., Denver, Colorado

A: Avodart (dutasteride 0.5mg) was approved by the FDA for the treatment of prostate enlargement in men in 2002. Avodart has not been approved for the treatment of androgenetic hair loss, although physicians can use an approved medication in ways other than for which it was specifically approved. That said, the use of dutasteride certainly requires a doctor’s supervision.

Posted by Updated
Hair Restoration Answers

Was Propecia Originally for Treatment of Prostate Enlargement?

Q: I heard that Propecia was being used originally for shrinking the prostate, is this true? — M.D., New Hyde Park, N.Y.

A: Propecia (finasteride 1mg) is not a prostate medication that was serendipitously noted to have a side effect of re-growing hair, it is a medication that was known all along that it might be able to slow hair loss and/or to grow hair.

Although finasteride was first approved for the treatment of prostate enlargement, the researchers at Merck knew, at the outset, that there were families whose members were deficient in the 5-alpha reductase Type II enzyme and that the men in these families neither developed prostate disease nor went bald. In addition they had no long-term problems from the lack of this enzyme.

Merck used this natural model to develop a medication that could block the 5-alpha reductase Type II enzyme – the result was finasteride. Because the only approved treatment for symptoms related to prostate enlargement at the time was surgery, Merck developed finasteride as a medical treatment for this condition prior to developing finasteride as a potential treatment for men with male pattern hair loss.

This also meant that Merck would understand the safety profile of finasteride, and have it approved for a medical disease (symptomatic prostate enlargement), before developing it for a cosmetic condition.

The drug was first submitted to the FDA for the treatment of prostate enlargement as Proscar (finasteride 5mg) in 1991 and it was approved for this use in 1992. The drug was submitted for the treatment of men with male pattern hair loss as Propecia (finasteride 1mg) in 1996 and was approved for this use in 1997.

Posted by Updated



Browse Hair Restoration Answers by topic: