Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair Restoration - Dr. Eric S. Schweiger
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Dr. Scweiger on GMA - Eyelash Enhancement

From hair extensions to eyelash enhancement, our resident expert on hair loss in women is on the case. Dr. Eric Schweiger was featured in a segment on Good Morning America where he discussed the enhancement of eyelashes, which he called, “a universal sign of beauty.”

According to Dr. Schweiger, eyelash enhancement is growing in popularity. One way to enhance your lashes is through topical hair loss medication called Latisse. Here is what Dr. Schweiger said on the topic:

“Latisse is a medicine you apply to the eyelash skin, and it actually increases the growth phase of the eyelashes,” Schweiger said, referring to the prescription treatment that is the first and only FDA-approved eyelash growth product. “You get longer, fuller eyelashes.”

In recent years, Latisse has attracted media attention for its eyelash growing properties. Testing has begun for use as an eyebrow enhancer and begun testing for hair loss on the scalp.

Read more about Latisse, which is the brand name for the product. The active ingredient in the medication is called bimatoprost.

The GMA segment goes on to discuss eyelash enhancement using eyelash extensions. Watch the segment below, or visit the article on ABC News:

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Dr. Schweiger on PIX 11 - Dangers of Hair Extensions

Dr. Schweiger lends his expertise on hair loss in women and cosmetic hair extensions in a segment on PIX 11 television. The interview with Dr. Steve Salvatore focused on the pitfalls of using some types of hair extensions, or using them improperly.

Hair extensions can result in undesirable bald patches caused by traction alopecia, which is hair loss due to a constant tugging on hair follicles.

Read the transcript of the interview below:

Dr. Steve: Dr. Schweiger, there are two types of hair extensions, tell me about those. The permanent and temporary type.

Dr. Schweiger: There are permanent and temporary. The temporary are just that. They are clip-on hair extensions, they’re meant to be used for weddings, special occasions, to test out a new hair style. And they are generally the safer of the hair extensions.

Then there are permanent hair extensions, and there are different types. One permanent type you actually sew into the hair.

Dr. Steve: So you sew it into the existing hair, not the scalp, but the existing hair.

Dr. Schweiger: Exactly, into the hair.

And the other types are either glued or they use metal clamps to put it into the hair and they stay in for anywhere from 1 month to 3 months at a time.

Dr. Steve: So what are the problems that you have with the… I mean, obviously the clip-on ones are probably fine, right? But these other ones, the more permanent ones, what are the problems you run into.

Dr. Schweiger: The main problem that we’re seeing in patients is what’s called traction alopecia. And traction alopecia can come from tight braids or tight hair extensions and it leads to hair loss. Alopecia is just the medical term for hair loss. We’re seeing young patients who are using these products to look better, actually ending up with bald patches and looking worse.

[……]

Dr. Steve: So, obviously you think that the temporary ones are better. What’s the treatment for something like that.

Dr. Schweiger: The first thing, [which] is obvious, is take out the hair extensions. And then go see your doctor to assess the damage. Oftentimes, time will grow back the hair, if not, we can use injections of cortisone. The last line is hair transplant surgery, which a lot of people don’t know is an option. With a hair transplant, we take out a long strip of hair in the back of the scalp, and we dissect it into slivers, then into individual hairs. Then, actually, place them in the balding area to bring back the hair.

Dr. Steve: And the good thing about that is it’s not the old transplants of the past that look like little cornrows. It really does look great. Dr. Schweiger and Chioma, thanks so much for coming. Really appreciate it.

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Dr. Schweiger on Good Morning America

Dr. Schweiger, our resident expert on hair loss in women, was featured in a segment about hair extensions on “Good Morning America” and ABC News online.

While many women extoll the cosmetic virtues of hair extensions — they are designed to add to the length and fullness of one’s hair — many others have realized the potential for extensions to cause hair loss.

Dr. Schweiger:

“We have patients who are in their early 20s come in after wearing hair extensions for six months or one year, and they actually have bald spots,” Dr. Eric Schweiger, a New York City dermatologist, told “Good Morning America.”

Some of the hair loss can be attributed to traction alopecia, which is localized hair loss that occurs with constant tugging on the follicles. However some of the problems occur due to underlying medical conditions, like anemia. Regardless the underlying cause, when someone is exposed to prolonged tension and weight from cosmetic enhancements, temporary or permanent areas of balding can occur. In some cases hair may grow back in those areas, but for individuals with permanent hair loss from extensions, hair transplantation may be the best treatment. In those cases, a visit to a hair restoration physician is the first step towards treating or repairing your hair loss.

This risk of damage to the hair is why it is important to use caution and care with extensions, as well as to have an understanding of potential issues the extensions might cause.

Dr. Schweiger on understanding these risks:

“It’s very important that people out there know the risks of hair extensions before they get them done,” said Dr. Schweiger. “If you’re going to do any extensions, just use them for a few hours and take them out. That’s the safest way.”

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Dr. Eric S. Schweiger - Associate at Bernstein Medical - Center for Hair RestorationDr. Eric S. Schweiger, board-certified dermatologist, is quoted in a few recent articles on the effects of chemotherapy on hair, genetic testing for hair loss, and protecting a balding scalp from the sun.

“Coping with Chemo-Induced Hair Loss” was published in a recent issue of Energy Times, a publication focused on wellness and nutrition. Dr. Schweiger commented on the way hair follicles can react to chemotherapy treatment for cancer patients:

Expect changes like “chemo curl.” Eric Schweiger, MD, explains that chemo shocks rapidly dividing cells like hair follicles in the scalp, causing the hair loss. “When the follicles grow again, the shock sometimes changes how they grow, temporarily resulting in a different hair texture and color, which eventually normalizes,” explains Schweiger.

In the article, “Genetic Testing to Predict Hair Loss,” published on HairLoss.com, Dr. Schweiger and Dr. Bernstein discussed the efficacy of genetic tests for hair loss:

[Dr. Schweiger] explains, “I think the test has probably identified a predictor of hair loss but not the only predictor. There is science behind the test and some published research studies; however, the longitudinal, larger studies have not been done, because this testing procedure is just too new.” Dr. Robert Bernstein, M.D., director at Bernstein Medical Center, agrees and adds, “These tests focus on one particular dominant gene, but what is becoming apparent is that hair loss is a complex genetic condition most likely involving several different genes.” He further notes that age, stress, hormone levels, disease and many other factors also are at play in determining factors for hair loss. “Just because a person has the genes for baldness, it doesn’t mean the trait will manifest itself. The truth is the cause and effect have not been proven and differ from person to person, and the association is not anywhere near 100 percent.”

[…]

“Right now, we predict future hair loss based on follicle miniaturization, using advanced microscopic equipment,” says Dr. Schweiger, “and I advise a man to do this at around age 25. If someone presents with more than 25 percent miniaturization, then it’s time to start a hair loss prevention regimen.”

Lastly, Dr. Schweiger contributed featured commentary to an article on HairLoss.com on a topic of importance to those suffering from hair loss, namely, protecting your scalp from the dangerous radiation given off by the sun. In “When You Lose Your Hair, Protect Your Scalp,” Dr. Schweiger encourages bald or balding individuals to take important steps to protect their scalps:

…if you notice your hair thinning or you have baldness of any kind for any reason, it’s important to protect your scalp from sun damage, precancer and skin cancer,” says Dr. Eric Schweiger, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and hair transplant surgeon at Bernstein Medical — Center for Hair Restoration in New York City. That’s because 100 percent of the surface area on top of your head directly faces the sun’s burning rays when the sun is strongest, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. “In general, a mild sunburn on your scalp won’t harm your hair follicles. But any exposure that causes blistering can cause scarring and pre-cancer cells, which will harm hair follicles permanently, so you need to take special care of your scalp when exposed to the sun, even for only a few minutes,” explains Schweiger.

Set up a hair loss consultation with one of our board certified physicians.

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Wall Street JournalDr. Eric S. Schweiger, an Associate at Bernstein Medical – Center for Hair Restoration, was interviewed recently for an article in the Wall Street Journal.

The article — Can Lasers Stimulate a Hair-Growth Spurt? — discusses the efficacy of the HairMax LaserComb and low level laser therapy (LLLT) and also touches on Dr. Schweiger’s main area of expertise, the diagnosis and treatment of hair loss in women:

Eric S. Schweiger, a clinical instructor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, says the LaserComb helps grow hair, but adds that effects are often modest, typically take at least six months and aren’t seen in all patients.

The only home laser device cleared for hair growth by the Food and Drug Administration is the LaserComb, which claims to increase hair growth in men. While used by Dr. Schweiger and others for women, the device isn’t FDA cleared for them; a clinical trial is continuing, the company says.

Read more about low level laser therapy (LLLT) and the HairMax LaserComb. For further reading you can explore the Laser Therapy topic.

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